Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Unraveling the Southern Pastoral Tradition: A New Look at Kate Chopin's At Fault

Unraveling the Southern Pastoral Tradition: A New Look at Kate Chopin's At Fault Unraveling the Southern Pastoral Tradition: A New Look at Kate Chopin's At Fault by Maureen Anderson Nine years before Kate Chopin unveiled The Awakening (1899), she selfpublished her first novel, At Fault. The novel, considered by critics as a worthy piece of fiction, established Chopin as a new and talented writer. The story of a widow running a plantation in the Natchitoches Parish of Louisiana, At Fault reflects Chopin's own life. After two years of widowhood and successfully running her husband's business, Chopin left the Natchitoches Parish for St. Louis in mid-1884, partly because of her involvement with Albert Sampite, a married man.1 After a year in St. Louis and shortly after her mother's death, Chopin began writing for publication.2 Like Thérèse in At Fault, Chopin faced a decision between love and traditional ethics in her relationship with Sampite. Because Sampite was a southern Catholic, he could not divorce. In Louisiana when a couple did divorce, civil law prohibited either partner from marrying a lover. Consequently, Chopin had reason to question what she called an old southern "code of righteousness" that prevented her as well as her female protagonist in At Fault from happiness. At Fault (1890) exhibits http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Unraveling the Southern Pastoral Tradition: A New Look at Kate Chopin's At Fault

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 34 (1) – Dec 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/unraveling-the-southern-pastoral-tradition-a-new-look-at-kate-chopin-s-8g0xZrqFXJ
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Department of English of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
ISSN
1534-1461
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Unraveling the Southern Pastoral Tradition: A New Look at Kate Chopin's At Fault by Maureen Anderson Nine years before Kate Chopin unveiled The Awakening (1899), she selfpublished her first novel, At Fault. The novel, considered by critics as a worthy piece of fiction, established Chopin as a new and talented writer. The story of a widow running a plantation in the Natchitoches Parish of Louisiana, At Fault reflects Chopin's own life. After two years of widowhood and successfully running her husband's business, Chopin left the Natchitoches Parish for St. Louis in mid-1884, partly because of her involvement with Albert Sampite, a married man.1 After a year in St. Louis and shortly after her mother's death, Chopin began writing for publication.2 Like Thérèse in At Fault, Chopin faced a decision between love and traditional ethics in her relationship with Sampite. Because Sampite was a southern Catholic, he could not divorce. In Louisiana when a couple did divorce, civil law prohibited either partner from marrying a lover. Consequently, Chopin had reason to question what she called an old southern "code of righteousness" that prevented her as well as her female protagonist in At Fault from happiness. At Fault (1890) exhibits

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Dec 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.