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Two on Flannery O'Conner

Two on Flannery O'Conner Two on Flannery O’Connor by Joseph M. Flora Flannery O’Connor: The Obedient Imagination. By Sarah Gordon. Athens: U of Georgia P, 2000. 270 pp. $19.95. Flannery O’Connor: Hermit Novelist t t. By Richard Giannone. Urbana: U of Illinois P, 2000. 287 pp. $35.00. Although Flannery O’Connor’s life was short, her art is long— as is attested by the outpouring of critical studies on her work. In Flannery O’Connor: The Obedient Imagination, Sarah Gordon ac- counts for the tension in O’Connor’s work by seeing her art as a result of her rejection of the “matrilineal” in favor of the “patrilineal.” After grad- uating from the college in her hometown, then Georgia State College for Women, O’Connor, seeking independence and a broader world, earned a Master’s degree from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop. She then proceeded to the artist’s colony Yadoo and then New York City. But as every student of her work knows, her health would mandate that she leave the North and return to rural Georgia to live with her mother. There she continued to write a fi ction that did not wince at the un- sightly, a fi ction that some deemed inappropriate for a woman writer. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Two on Flannery O'Conner

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 37 (1) – Jan 11, 2005

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Two on Flannery O’Connor by Joseph M. Flora Flannery O’Connor: The Obedient Imagination. By Sarah Gordon. Athens: U of Georgia P, 2000. 270 pp. $19.95. Flannery O’Connor: Hermit Novelist t t. By Richard Giannone. Urbana: U of Illinois P, 2000. 287 pp. $35.00. Although Flannery O’Connor’s life was short, her art is long— as is attested by the outpouring of critical studies on her work. In Flannery O’Connor: The Obedient Imagination, Sarah Gordon ac- counts for the tension in O’Connor’s work by seeing her art as a result of her rejection of the “matrilineal” in favor of the “patrilineal.” After grad- uating from the college in her hometown, then Georgia State College for Women, O’Connor, seeking independence and a broader world, earned a Master’s degree from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop. She then proceeded to the artist’s colony Yadoo and then New York City. But as every student of her work knows, her health would mandate that she leave the North and return to rural Georgia to live with her mother. There she continued to write a fi ction that did not wince at the un- sightly, a fi ction that some deemed inappropriate for a woman writer.

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 11, 2005

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