Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Towards a Fanonian Poetics: Cultural Decolonization as Translation

Towards a Fanonian Poetics: Cultural Decolonization as Translation RichaRd L. W. cL aRke Towards a Fanonian Poetics Cultural Decolonization as Translation In what follows, I shall attempt to provide a close reading of Fanon’s oen ci ft ted but dense, highly complex, richly allusive and rarely carefully dissected “On Na- tional Culture,” the seminal fourth chapter of The Wretched of the Earth , with a few passing gestures along the way to related essays of his such as “Racism and Culture.” My thesis here is that much light is shed on Fanon’s theory of cultural decolonization by conceptualizing cultural history as predicated on processes of translation, perhaps the best guide to which is George Steiner’s After Ba. I a bel rgue, in light of this, that Fanon advances a dialectical model of post- colo nial national culture as developing in three principal stages. During the first (the thesis), which I shall term the dominant neo-c lassical phase, the assumption that human nature is universal informs the tendency of the colonized artist to regurgita no te t only many of the preoccupations but also, most importantly, the for o mfs the colo- nizer’s cultural practices. The cultural production specific to this stage is analo- gous to what, in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Towards a Fanonian Poetics: Cultural Decolonization as Translation

The Comparatist , Volume 43 – Nov 15, 2019

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/towards-a-fanonian-poetics-cultural-decolonization-as-translation-xP1tmo3lpG
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Comparative Literature and the Arts
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

RichaRd L. W. cL aRke Towards a Fanonian Poetics Cultural Decolonization as Translation In what follows, I shall attempt to provide a close reading of Fanon’s oen ci ft ted but dense, highly complex, richly allusive and rarely carefully dissected “On Na- tional Culture,” the seminal fourth chapter of The Wretched of the Earth , with a few passing gestures along the way to related essays of his such as “Racism and Culture.” My thesis here is that much light is shed on Fanon’s theory of cultural decolonization by conceptualizing cultural history as predicated on processes of translation, perhaps the best guide to which is George Steiner’s After Ba. I a bel rgue, in light of this, that Fanon advances a dialectical model of post- colo nial national culture as developing in three principal stages. During the first (the thesis), which I shall term the dominant neo-c lassical phase, the assumption that human nature is universal informs the tendency of the colonized artist to regurgita no te t only many of the preoccupations but also, most importantly, the for o mfs the colo- nizer’s cultural practices. The cultural production specific to this stage is analo- gous to what, in

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 15, 2019

There are no references for this article.