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Toward a Productive Interdisciplinary Relationship: Between Comparative Literature and World Literature

Toward a Productive Interdisciplinary Relationship: Between Comparative Literature and World... John Pizer Toward a Productive Interdisciplinary Relationship Between Comparative Literature and World Literature Goethe’s concept of world literature (Weltliteratu ) h r as been subjected to much scholarly analysis in recent years. As Christopher Prendergast notes in the intro- duction to one of the most recent books devoted to this paradigm, Debating World Literatu , r W e eltliteratu hr as primarily attracted interest “in two (oe ft n overlapping) areas of inquiry, comparative literature and postcolonial studies, most notably (and especially in the United States) in connection with the theme of globalization” (vii). e Th cosmopolitan nuance inherent in Goethe’s vision of a mutually fruitful dia - logue among discrete national literatures was enabled in the 20s, 18 when he created the paradigm, by improved communication infrastructures, increased translation activity, and a political atmosphere in which nationalist sentiments had been tem- porarily exhausted by the Napoleonic Wars and marginalized through the machi- nations of the Congress of Vienna. In this essay I will explore Goethe’s Weltliteratu r concept, the German view of the relationship between Weltliteratu an r d compara- tive literature, the coni fl cted interaction between world literature and comparative literature in the United States, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Toward a Productive Interdisciplinary Relationship: Between Comparative Literature and World Literature

The Comparatist , Volume 31 – May 29, 2007

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

John Pizer Toward a Productive Interdisciplinary Relationship Between Comparative Literature and World Literature Goethe’s concept of world literature (Weltliteratu ) h r as been subjected to much scholarly analysis in recent years. As Christopher Prendergast notes in the intro- duction to one of the most recent books devoted to this paradigm, Debating World Literatu , r W e eltliteratu hr as primarily attracted interest “in two (oe ft n overlapping) areas of inquiry, comparative literature and postcolonial studies, most notably (and especially in the United States) in connection with the theme of globalization” (vii). e Th cosmopolitan nuance inherent in Goethe’s vision of a mutually fruitful dia - logue among discrete national literatures was enabled in the 20s, 18 when he created the paradigm, by improved communication infrastructures, increased translation activity, and a political atmosphere in which nationalist sentiments had been tem- porarily exhausted by the Napoleonic Wars and marginalized through the machi- nations of the Congress of Vienna. In this essay I will explore Goethe’s Weltliteratu r concept, the German view of the relationship between Weltliteratu an r d compara- tive literature, the coni fl cted interaction between world literature and comparative literature in the United States, and

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 29, 2007

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