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Tourism, Imperialism, and Hybridity in the Reconstruction South: Constance Fenimore Woolson's Rodman the Keeper: Southern Sketches

Tourism, Imperialism, and Hybridity in the Reconstruction South: Constance Fenimore Woolson's... Tourism, Imperialism, and Hybridity in the Reconstruction South: Constance Fenimore Woolson's Rodman the Keeper: Southern Sketches by Anne E. Boyd "Now that the little monkey has gone, I may be able at last to catch and fix a likeness of her." -- Kitty, "Felipa" (1876) At their core, issues of imperialism coalesce around such concepts as center and margin, dominance and subjugation, self and other -- binaries at the heart of the ten stories collected in Constance Fenimore Woolson's Rodman the Keeper: Southern Sketches (1880). I am interested not only in excavating these binaries in Woolson's southern fiction, but also in examining what happens to the tensions between them. Ultimately, these tensions are not neatly resolved, as they often were in popular postwar reunion romances. As many postcolonial theorists have noted, sooner or later the encounter between cultures and peoples results not only in clashes but also in a mingling that creates forms of doubleness or hybridity, a term often used today to connote the mixture of cultures, but which has its origins in nineteenth-century conceptions of racial difference. A reading of Woolson's fiction in this context suggests her discomfort with the effects of imperialism, particularly a form http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Tourism, Imperialism, and Hybridity in the Reconstruction South: Constance Fenimore Woolson's Rodman the Keeper: Southern Sketches

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 43 (2) – May 26, 2011

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
1534-1461
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Abstract

Tourism, Imperialism, and Hybridity in the Reconstruction South: Constance Fenimore Woolson's Rodman the Keeper: Southern Sketches by Anne E. Boyd "Now that the little monkey has gone, I may be able at last to catch and fix a likeness of her." -- Kitty, "Felipa" (1876) At their core, issues of imperialism coalesce around such concepts as center and margin, dominance and subjugation, self and other -- binaries at the heart of the ten stories collected in Constance Fenimore Woolson's Rodman the Keeper: Southern Sketches (1880). I am interested not only in excavating these binaries in Woolson's southern fiction, but also in examining what happens to the tensions between them. Ultimately, these tensions are not neatly resolved, as they often were in popular postwar reunion romances. As many postcolonial theorists have noted, sooner or later the encounter between cultures and peoples results not only in clashes but also in a mingling that creates forms of doubleness or hybridity, a term often used today to connote the mixture of cultures, but which has its origins in nineteenth-century conceptions of racial difference. A reading of Woolson's fiction in this context suggests her discomfort with the effects of imperialism, particularly a form

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 26, 2011

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