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To Compare, To World: Two Verbs, One Discipline

To Compare, To World: Two Verbs, One Discipline Djelal Ka Dir To Compare, To World Two Verbs, One Discipline In a special 4 200 issue of Comparative Literature Studies devoted to “World Litera- ture and Globalization,” I considered the possibilities of “world” as a verb, as a tran- sitive verb, to be exact.1 Once “to world” is read as transitive, the ensuing question about the binomial “world literature” would logically become “which world are we worlding literature into and why?” And, concomitantly, from what position are we worlding world literature? On this occasion, I invite us to consider the verb “to compare” as an intransitive verb. Logically, this would lead to the grammatical subject of comparison as some- thing or someone other than us, the comparatists. e Th focus in “to compare” as in- transitive verb would fall on what it is that compares and how. For our disciplinary purposes, the focus would fall on literature. i Th s focus is not an insignic fi ant event, especially for those in comparative literature who confess to no longer be reading any literature. Arbitrary as the proposed exercise might appear, I believe it could possibly shed some light on the dual phrases “comparative literature” and “world literature” that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

To Compare, To World: Two Verbs, One Discipline

The Comparatist , Volume 34 – Jun 24, 2010

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Djelal Ka Dir To Compare, To World Two Verbs, One Discipline In a special 4 200 issue of Comparative Literature Studies devoted to “World Litera- ture and Globalization,” I considered the possibilities of “world” as a verb, as a tran- sitive verb, to be exact.1 Once “to world” is read as transitive, the ensuing question about the binomial “world literature” would logically become “which world are we worlding literature into and why?” And, concomitantly, from what position are we worlding world literature? On this occasion, I invite us to consider the verb “to compare” as an intransitive verb. Logically, this would lead to the grammatical subject of comparison as some- thing or someone other than us, the comparatists. e Th focus in “to compare” as in- transitive verb would fall on what it is that compares and how. For our disciplinary purposes, the focus would fall on literature. i Th s focus is not an insignic fi ant event, especially for those in comparative literature who confess to no longer be reading any literature. Arbitrary as the proposed exercise might appear, I believe it could possibly shed some light on the dual phrases “comparative literature” and “world literature” that

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 24, 2010

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