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Throwaway Bodies in the Poetry of Natasha Trethewey

Throwaway Bodies in the Poetry of Natasha Trethewey Jill go ad thr o waway bodies in the poetry of natasha trethe wey In Dirt and Desire, Patricia Yaeger notes that critics tend to see southern literature as a “route to the Trethewey’s dead, to the embarrassing, disavowed American past” (61) that scholars seek to transcend because ekphrastic poetry the traumas and tragedies of southern history feel too familiar. In eff ect, critics have seen southern comes alive as literature as comprised of trite tropes that off er a simultaneous no rich ground for theoretical exploration. Yaeger tribute to the argues, however, that turning away from southern literature means shunning what we actually do not powers of the understand: a place of brutal racism that “produces photograph extraordinary works of art” (61). Where the writing of white women about the South is theoretically and an “domesticated” (Yaeger 62) with its racial violence acknowledgment appearing commonplace, black women writing about the South are marginalized. Thus, their work of the medium’s requires theoretical attention beyond that which is limitations. needed for white southern women writers. In chapter three, Yaeger argues that one literary trope in need of analysis outside the lens of south- ern literary truisms is the “cast-off , http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Throwaway Bodies in the Poetry of Natasha Trethewey

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 48 (2) – Nov 17, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Jill go ad thr o waway bodies in the poetry of natasha trethe wey In Dirt and Desire, Patricia Yaeger notes that critics tend to see southern literature as a “route to the Trethewey’s dead, to the embarrassing, disavowed American past” (61) that scholars seek to transcend because ekphrastic poetry the traumas and tragedies of southern history feel too familiar. In eff ect, critics have seen southern comes alive as literature as comprised of trite tropes that off er a simultaneous no rich ground for theoretical exploration. Yaeger tribute to the argues, however, that turning away from southern literature means shunning what we actually do not powers of the understand: a place of brutal racism that “produces photograph extraordinary works of art” (61). Where the writing of white women about the South is theoretically and an “domesticated” (Yaeger 62) with its racial violence acknowledgment appearing commonplace, black women writing about the South are marginalized. Thus, their work of the medium’s requires theoretical attention beyond that which is limitations. needed for white southern women writers. In chapter three, Yaeger argues that one literary trope in need of analysis outside the lens of south- ern literary truisms is the “cast-off ,

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 17, 2016

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