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“They Cover the Land Like the Locusts of Egypt”: Fugitive Federal Prisoners of War and the Collapse of the Confederacy

“They Cover the Land Like the Locusts of Egypt”: Fugitive Federal Prisoners of War and the... lori en foote “They Cover the Land Like the Locusts of Egypt” Fugitive Federal Prisoners of War and the Collapse of the Confederacy Three officers from Maine volunteer regiments huddled together for warmth in the woods sixteen miles north of Newberry, South Carolina, on November 10, 1864. They had escaped from a Confederate prisoner- of-war camp outside of Columbia eight days before and were headed for Knoxville, Tennessee. The moon was large and bright, and it would not be safe for them to move until well after 9:00 p.m., when most residents of the area would be asleep. They wanted to put distance between them- selves and other escaped Federals, but that was proving to be a difficult task. When they skirted Newberry on November 9, they encountered two other parties, of four men each, and learned that seven others had been recaptured on the same road the day before. Maj. Charles Porter Mattocks, Lt. Charles O. Hunt, and Capt. Julius B. Litchfield were 3 out of 2,676 Union officers and soldiers who sneaked across the South Carolina coun - tryside between September 1864 and February 1865. On November 30, the Edgefield Advertiser aptly summed up the situation in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

“They Cover the Land Like the Locusts of Egypt”: Fugitive Federal Prisoners of War and the Collapse of the Confederacy

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 6 (1) – Mar 12, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

lori en foote “They Cover the Land Like the Locusts of Egypt” Fugitive Federal Prisoners of War and the Collapse of the Confederacy Three officers from Maine volunteer regiments huddled together for warmth in the woods sixteen miles north of Newberry, South Carolina, on November 10, 1864. They had escaped from a Confederate prisoner- of-war camp outside of Columbia eight days before and were headed for Knoxville, Tennessee. The moon was large and bright, and it would not be safe for them to move until well after 9:00 p.m., when most residents of the area would be asleep. They wanted to put distance between them- selves and other escaped Federals, but that was proving to be a difficult task. When they skirted Newberry on November 9, they encountered two other parties, of four men each, and learned that seven others had been recaptured on the same road the day before. Maj. Charles Porter Mattocks, Lt. Charles O. Hunt, and Capt. Julius B. Litchfield were 3 out of 2,676 Union officers and soldiers who sneaked across the South Carolina coun - tryside between September 1864 and February 1865. On November 30, the Edgefield Advertiser aptly summed up the situation in

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 12, 2016

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