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The Wife Upstairs by Rachel Hawkins (review)

The Wife Upstairs by Rachel Hawkins (review) sensus on Sartre’s antifascism, it establishes the affinities of passages in La N ausée (1938) and his play Les Mouches (1943) with the binaristic logic of fascist texts that seek to immunize the male subject against the threat of an abject, feminized ma- teriality. Yet this is not a study which is simply seeking to unmask p fas rocist im to- - munological thinking in modern drama; rather, it attempts to locate such thinking at a more foundational level, as part of a modern condition of experiencing and enacting community and identity. The book’s analysis of Bertolt Brecht demonstrates his disruption of the im- munitarian logic identified in Strindberg and Sartre through the titular antihero of his early play Baal (1920), who celebrates abjection in a “transgression of social, psychic and ultimately ontological categories” (134). In the final chapters, Antonin Artaud’s theoretical association of the theatre with “contagion” signals his em- bracing of the very anxieties which Sartre and Strindberg sought to protect against. Artaud’s reconception of Western theatre away from the discursive and toward a play of gesture, expression and sound, lends itself splendidly to Fraunhofer’s trans- versal approach, and his Theatre of Cruelty appeals to both the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

The Wife Upstairs by Rachel Hawkins (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 45 – Nov 11, 2021

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Copyright © Society for Comparative Literature and the Arts
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

sensus on Sartre’s antifascism, it establishes the affinities of passages in La N ausée (1938) and his play Les Mouches (1943) with the binaristic logic of fascist texts that seek to immunize the male subject against the threat of an abject, feminized ma- teriality. Yet this is not a study which is simply seeking to unmask p fas rocist im to- - munological thinking in modern drama; rather, it attempts to locate such thinking at a more foundational level, as part of a modern condition of experiencing and enacting community and identity. The book’s analysis of Bertolt Brecht demonstrates his disruption of the im- munitarian logic identified in Strindberg and Sartre through the titular antihero of his early play Baal (1920), who celebrates abjection in a “transgression of social, psychic and ultimately ontological categories” (134). In the final chapters, Antonin Artaud’s theoretical association of the theatre with “contagion” signals his em- bracing of the very anxieties which Sartre and Strindberg sought to protect against. Artaud’s reconception of Western theatre away from the discursive and toward a play of gesture, expression and sound, lends itself splendidly to Fraunhofer’s trans- versal approach, and his Theatre of Cruelty appeals to both the

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 11, 2021

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