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The Nature of the South

The Nature of the South The Nature of the South by Scott Romine River of Dreams: Imagining the Mississippi before Mark Twain. By Thomas Ruys Smith. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 2007. xxiv + 232 pp. $38.00 cloth. Disturbing Indians: The Archaeology of Southern Fiction. By Annette Trefzer. Tuscaloosa: U of Alabama P, 2007. xvii + 223 pp. $38.50 cloth, $30.80 e-book. Shadow and Shelter: The Swamp in Southern Culture. By Anthony Wilson. Jackson: UP of Mississippi, 2006. xxv + 208 pp. $31.50 cloth, $17.50 paper. My tenth-grade Language Arts teacher insisted that all literature could be (and, in her class, would be) fit into one of three thematic categories: man's [sic] relationship to nature, man's relationship to man, and man's relation to himself. (As I recall, the last was usually the safest bet, since some internal psychodrama could usually be wrenched out of the text at hand.) The works under review here may appear at first glance to fit fairly neatly under category one. But as even a cursory second glance shows, categories two and three inevitably make their appearance, and they do so in markedly different ways. If nature -- or, in Trefzer's case, the figure of the Indian as an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

The Nature of the South

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 42 (1) – Jan 27, 2009

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
1534-1461
Publisher site
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Abstract

The Nature of the South by Scott Romine River of Dreams: Imagining the Mississippi before Mark Twain. By Thomas Ruys Smith. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 2007. xxiv + 232 pp. $38.00 cloth. Disturbing Indians: The Archaeology of Southern Fiction. By Annette Trefzer. Tuscaloosa: U of Alabama P, 2007. xvii + 223 pp. $38.50 cloth, $30.80 e-book. Shadow and Shelter: The Swamp in Southern Culture. By Anthony Wilson. Jackson: UP of Mississippi, 2006. xxv + 208 pp. $31.50 cloth, $17.50 paper. My tenth-grade Language Arts teacher insisted that all literature could be (and, in her class, would be) fit into one of three thematic categories: man's [sic] relationship to nature, man's relationship to man, and man's relation to himself. (As I recall, the last was usually the safest bet, since some internal psychodrama could usually be wrenched out of the text at hand.) The works under review here may appear at first glance to fit fairly neatly under category one. But as even a cursory second glance shows, categories two and three inevitably make their appearance, and they do so in markedly different ways. If nature -- or, in Trefzer's case, the figure of the Indian as an

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 27, 2009

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