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The Morals of History (review)

The Morals of History (review) THE COMPAKATIST coexistence, some tentative rules ofplanetary behavior, that liberal education may adumbrate but cannot enforce." Hassan's question: "Where is the Archimedean point of both local and global awareness on this earth?" (135) brings up a whole range of ethical, political, and philosophical controversies concerning the role of unifying values in a radically dynamic, conflict-laden, and hybrid world. How indeed is one to conceptualize this Archimedean point without falling into the traps of ahistorical objectivism and cultural hegemony? The American Declaration of Independence and its motto, "Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness," Hassan suggests, may be a starting-point for (reinventing such transcultural principles. Despite its different cultures, ethnicities, and politics, Hassan argues, the contemporary world shares a quest for "happiness" that is "found in freedom from hunger, disease, bondage, pain" (135-36). At first glance, Hassan's argument seems to raise the specter ofthe West's ethnocentric projection of supposedly universal values on non-Western realities. Moreover, the lofty promises of the Declaration of Independence have from the beginning remained sadly unfulfilled even within American society and its history of exclusion and oppression. Sharply critical of the social malaise and intellectual climate of the United philosophical tradition of natural rights, he http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

The Morals of History (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 21 (1) – Oct 3, 1997

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887
Publisher site
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Abstract

THE COMPAKATIST coexistence, some tentative rules ofplanetary behavior, that liberal education may adumbrate but cannot enforce." Hassan's question: "Where is the Archimedean point of both local and global awareness on this earth?" (135) brings up a whole range of ethical, political, and philosophical controversies concerning the role of unifying values in a radically dynamic, conflict-laden, and hybrid world. How indeed is one to conceptualize this Archimedean point without falling into the traps of ahistorical objectivism and cultural hegemony? The American Declaration of Independence and its motto, "Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness," Hassan suggests, may be a starting-point for (reinventing such transcultural principles. Despite its different cultures, ethnicities, and politics, Hassan argues, the contemporary world shares a quest for "happiness" that is "found in freedom from hunger, disease, bondage, pain" (135-36). At first glance, Hassan's argument seems to raise the specter ofthe West's ethnocentric projection of supposedly universal values on non-Western realities. Moreover, the lofty promises of the Declaration of Independence have from the beginning remained sadly unfulfilled even within American society and its history of exclusion and oppression. Sharply critical of the social malaise and intellectual climate of the United philosophical tradition of natural rights, he

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 1997

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