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The Local, National, and International Politics of Slavery: Edward Everett’s Nomination as U.S. Minister to Great Britain

The Local, National, and International Politics of Slavery: Edward Everett’s Nomination as U.S.... matth ew mason The Local, National, and International Politics of Slavery Edward Everett’s Nomination as U.S. Minister to Great Britain On July 16, 1841, President John Tyler nominated Edward Everett to be the United States’ minister to Great Britain. The Senate debated Everett’s nomination in executive sessions; this dragged on intermittently until Everett’s appointment was confirmed by a 23–19 vote on September 13, the last day of this special session of Congress. The Senate’s executive ses- sions were secret, but as the delay grew protracted word leaked out that southern senators opposed Everett’s appointment because they consid- ered him a dangerous abolitionist. Those in the press who seconded that opposition based it on public letters Everett had written while governor of Massachusetts in the late 1830s. The resulting press furor in the North produced talk of retaliation and ultimately disunion. The storm dissipated when Everett won confirmation, but its lightning had illuminated how interconnected local, national, and international questions could be in American politics when slavery was at issue. Most historians of American foreign relations have underrated the links between sectional domestic politics and international questions. Those who call for study of these connections continue to take the posture http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

The Local, National, and International Politics of Slavery: Edward Everett’s Nomination as U.S. Minister to Great Britain

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 6 (1) – Mar 12, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

matth ew mason The Local, National, and International Politics of Slavery Edward Everett’s Nomination as U.S. Minister to Great Britain On July 16, 1841, President John Tyler nominated Edward Everett to be the United States’ minister to Great Britain. The Senate debated Everett’s nomination in executive sessions; this dragged on intermittently until Everett’s appointment was confirmed by a 23–19 vote on September 13, the last day of this special session of Congress. The Senate’s executive ses- sions were secret, but as the delay grew protracted word leaked out that southern senators opposed Everett’s appointment because they consid- ered him a dangerous abolitionist. Those in the press who seconded that opposition based it on public letters Everett had written while governor of Massachusetts in the late 1830s. The resulting press furor in the North produced talk of retaliation and ultimately disunion. The storm dissipated when Everett won confirmation, but its lightning had illuminated how interconnected local, national, and international questions could be in American politics when slavery was at issue. Most historians of American foreign relations have underrated the links between sectional domestic politics and international questions. Those who call for study of these connections continue to take the posture

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 12, 2016

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