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The ICLA and Disciplinary Renewal

The ICLA and Disciplinary Renewal s teven P. s on Dru P e i Th c l a and Disciplinary Renewal Narcissism is certainly not regarded as an attractive or desirable personal trait, and in its most extreme clinical form has serious pathological consequences. From its inception and certainly from its establishment in North America as a wide-spread academic discipline, Comparative Literature has occasionally manifested certain narcissistic characteristics or at least a marked tendency to ree fl ct back on itself and its methods of literary research. Although other academic disciplines have cer- tainly taken the opportunity for self-ree fl ction, the tendency in the Comparative Literature community has been, perhaps, more pronounced since it emerged as an acknowledged discipline far more recently than its close academic relatives and has had to g fi ht for intellectual and institutional legitimacy with a notable degree of fervor and energy. Manifestations of this self-ree fl xivity extend from the legendary debates that pitted what was known as the French model against the American to the now periodic and institutionalized reports on the nature of the discipline. Although all comparatists from sometime early in their career on have had to contend with the awkwardness of their discipline’s http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

The ICLA and Disciplinary Renewal

The Comparatist , Volume 32 – May 24, 2008

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

s teven P. s on Dru P e i Th c l a and Disciplinary Renewal Narcissism is certainly not regarded as an attractive or desirable personal trait, and in its most extreme clinical form has serious pathological consequences. From its inception and certainly from its establishment in North America as a wide-spread academic discipline, Comparative Literature has occasionally manifested certain narcissistic characteristics or at least a marked tendency to ree fl ct back on itself and its methods of literary research. Although other academic disciplines have cer- tainly taken the opportunity for self-ree fl ction, the tendency in the Comparative Literature community has been, perhaps, more pronounced since it emerged as an acknowledged discipline far more recently than its close academic relatives and has had to g fi ht for intellectual and institutional legitimacy with a notable degree of fervor and energy. Manifestations of this self-ree fl xivity extend from the legendary debates that pitted what was known as the French model against the American to the now periodic and institutionalized reports on the nature of the discipline. Although all comparatists from sometime early in their career on have had to contend with the awkwardness of their discipline’s

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 24, 2008

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