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The Function of Cynicism at the Present Time by Helen Small (review)

The Function of Cynicism at the Present Time by Helen Small (review) Review Essay Helen Small. e F Th unction of Cynicism at the Present Time Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020. xvi + 264 pp. Few ancient Greek thinkers were as colorful or memorable as Diogenes of Sinope— and perhaps no philosophical school from the period is as historically important to understanding contemporary neoliberal culture and society than Cynicism, the one with which his work is associated. As there are no extant writings by Diogenes, much of what has been attributed to him comes from Diogenes Laertius’ Lives and Opinions of Famous Philosophers, which is itself a collection of literary and oral traditions, and from literary representations by ancient writers such as Lucian and Dio Crysostom. Moreover, for all of its historical and continuing significance, there is both no extant treatise by anyone directly associated with ancient Cynicism and no record from antiquity that systemizes Cynic thought. Cynicism and the Cynics, which in Greek ( kynikos) literally means “dog- lik e,” took their name from “Cynosarges,” the building in ancient Athens that housed the school, one that flourished for about a thousand years, from roughly the fifth century before the common era to the fifth century of the common era. Cynicism http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

The Function of Cynicism at the Present Time by Helen Small (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 45 – Nov 11, 2021

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Copyright © Society for Comparative Literature and the Arts
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Review Essay Helen Small. e F Th unction of Cynicism at the Present Time Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020. xvi + 264 pp. Few ancient Greek thinkers were as colorful or memorable as Diogenes of Sinope— and perhaps no philosophical school from the period is as historically important to understanding contemporary neoliberal culture and society than Cynicism, the one with which his work is associated. As there are no extant writings by Diogenes, much of what has been attributed to him comes from Diogenes Laertius’ Lives and Opinions of Famous Philosophers, which is itself a collection of literary and oral traditions, and from literary representations by ancient writers such as Lucian and Dio Crysostom. Moreover, for all of its historical and continuing significance, there is both no extant treatise by anyone directly associated with ancient Cynicism and no record from antiquity that systemizes Cynic thought. Cynicism and the Cynics, which in Greek ( kynikos) literally means “dog- lik e,” took their name from “Cynosarges,” the building in ancient Athens that housed the school, one that flourished for about a thousand years, from roughly the fifth century before the common era to the fifth century of the common era. Cynicism

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 11, 2021

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