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The Forster Connection or, Cosmopolitanism Redux: Zadie Smith's On Beauty, Howards End, and the Schlegels

The Forster Connection or, Cosmopolitanism Redux: Zadie Smith's On Beauty, Howards End, and... c hri Stian mora ru e F Th orster Connection or, Cosmopolitanism Redux Zadie Smith’s On Beauty, Howards End, and the Schlegels We know this is our house, because it feels ours. E.M. Forster, Howards End “e Th re is such shelter in each other,” Carlene tells her friend Kiki in Zadie Smith’s 2005 nove O l n Beauty (93). e Th sentence, critics have been quick to point out, can be traced to Howards End ’s famous epigraph and chapter 22 passage: “Only con- nect! . . . Only connect the prose and the passion, and both will be exalted, and human love will be seen at its highest. Live in fragments no longer. Only connect, and the beast and the monk, robbed of the isolation that is life to either, will die” (168). Smith herself has acknowledged, in fact, that “from the r fi st line, . . . this is a novel inspired by a love for E.M. Forster, to whom my all c fi tion is indebted, one way or the other.” “i Th s time,” she goes on specify, “I wanted to repay the debt with hommage” (Smith, On Beauty “Acknowledgements”).1 To be sure, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

The Forster Connection or, Cosmopolitanism Redux: Zadie Smith's On Beauty, Howards End, and the Schlegels

The Comparatist , Volume 35 – Jun 15, 2011

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

c hri Stian mora ru e F Th orster Connection or, Cosmopolitanism Redux Zadie Smith’s On Beauty, Howards End, and the Schlegels We know this is our house, because it feels ours. E.M. Forster, Howards End “e Th re is such shelter in each other,” Carlene tells her friend Kiki in Zadie Smith’s 2005 nove O l n Beauty (93). e Th sentence, critics have been quick to point out, can be traced to Howards End ’s famous epigraph and chapter 22 passage: “Only con- nect! . . . Only connect the prose and the passion, and both will be exalted, and human love will be seen at its highest. Live in fragments no longer. Only connect, and the beast and the monk, robbed of the isolation that is life to either, will die” (168). Smith herself has acknowledged, in fact, that “from the r fi st line, . . . this is a novel inspired by a love for E.M. Forster, to whom my all c fi tion is indebted, one way or the other.” “i Th s time,” she goes on specify, “I wanted to repay the debt with hommage” (Smith, On Beauty “Acknowledgements”).1 To be sure,

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 15, 2011

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