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The Fantasy of Technoimmortality and the Psychoanalytic Infinite

The Fantasy of Technoimmortality and the Psychoanalytic Infinite AllA IvAnchIkovA The Fantasy of Technoimmortality and the Psychoanalytic Inn fi ite “Technoimmortality,” Martine Rothblatt writes, “means living so long that death (other than by suicide) is not thought of as a determining factor in one’s life.” Rothblatt, an inventor, the founder of Sirius satellite radio and a biomedical com- pany United Therapeutics, and an influential member of the global transhumanist movement, is unapologetic in her belief that death, as humans have known it, will one day be overcome. Another futurist and director of Google engineering Ray Kutzweil predicts the advent of digital immortality (some form of brain uploading) by 2045. 1 And Aubrey De Gray, a California- bas ed gerontologist, is known to have proclaimed that the first person to live 1000 years had already been born. The fan- tasy of technoimmortality, I argue in this essay, is emerging as one of the key fanta- sies of our historical moment. While not ne 2 it r w,esurfaced in the midst of our t - ur bulent present—revamped and backed by Silicon Valley venture capital—oer ff ing a positive ideation of the future and naming an object of hope for the huma- nity tor mented by apocalyptic visions of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

The Fantasy of Technoimmortality and the Psychoanalytic Infinite

The Comparatist , Volume 45 – Nov 11, 2021

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Copyright © Society for Comparative Literature and the Arts
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

AllA IvAnchIkovA The Fantasy of Technoimmortality and the Psychoanalytic Inn fi ite “Technoimmortality,” Martine Rothblatt writes, “means living so long that death (other than by suicide) is not thought of as a determining factor in one’s life.” Rothblatt, an inventor, the founder of Sirius satellite radio and a biomedical com- pany United Therapeutics, and an influential member of the global transhumanist movement, is unapologetic in her belief that death, as humans have known it, will one day be overcome. Another futurist and director of Google engineering Ray Kutzweil predicts the advent of digital immortality (some form of brain uploading) by 2045. 1 And Aubrey De Gray, a California- bas ed gerontologist, is known to have proclaimed that the first person to live 1000 years had already been born. The fan- tasy of technoimmortality, I argue in this essay, is emerging as one of the key fanta- sies of our historical moment. While not ne 2 it r w,esurfaced in the midst of our t - ur bulent present—revamped and backed by Silicon Valley venture capital—oer ff ing a positive ideation of the future and naming an object of hope for the huma- nity tor mented by apocalyptic visions of

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 11, 2021

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