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The Excesses of Earth in Kant’s Philosophy of Property

The Excesses of Earth in Kant’s Philosophy of Property Kelly Oliver In his most widely read essay, "Perpetual Peace" (1795), Kant proposes that the Third Definitive article of Perpetual Peace is based on the right to hospitality (hospitalitätsrecht), which is "the right of a stranger not to be treated with hostility when he arrives on someone else's territory" (105, 8:357). This hospitality or "hospitableness" (Wirtbarkeit) is not the right to be a guest (Gastrecht) because that requires entertaining the foreigner and taking him into one's own house; rather, Kant describes it as the right to visit (Besuchrecht) in order to present oneself to society for the sake of establishing commerce. Anyone has the right to visit any other territory to try to seek or attempt commercial relations with its inhabitants, but that is the limit of the right of hospitality (8:358). In other words, the "native inhabitants" are obligated only to listen to the proposal of the foreigner before they evict him from their territory. What Kant means by hospitality, then, is akin to that provided by the Dutch Innkeeper with whom he begins the essay; namely, to accept all visitors as a business transaction. Indeed, the word that he uses most frequently, and which is translated http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

The Excesses of Earth in Kant’s Philosophy of Property

The Comparatist , Volume 38 (1) – Oct 31, 2014

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887
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Abstract

Kelly Oliver In his most widely read essay, "Perpetual Peace" (1795), Kant proposes that the Third Definitive article of Perpetual Peace is based on the right to hospitality (hospitalitätsrecht), which is "the right of a stranger not to be treated with hostility when he arrives on someone else's territory" (105, 8:357). This hospitality or "hospitableness" (Wirtbarkeit) is not the right to be a guest (Gastrecht) because that requires entertaining the foreigner and taking him into one's own house; rather, Kant describes it as the right to visit (Besuchrecht) in order to present oneself to society for the sake of establishing commerce. Anyone has the right to visit any other territory to try to seek or attempt commercial relations with its inhabitants, but that is the limit of the right of hospitality (8:358). In other words, the "native inhabitants" are obligated only to listen to the proposal of the foreigner before they evict him from their territory. What Kant means by hospitality, then, is akin to that provided by the Dutch Innkeeper with whom he begins the essay; namely, to accept all visitors as a business transaction. Indeed, the word that he uses most frequently, and which is translated

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 31, 2014

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