Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Comedy of the “Para-site”: Duck Soup, Volpone, and Hamlet

The Comedy of the “Para-site”: Duck Soup, Volpone, and Hamlet Isaac HuI The Comedy of the “Para- site” Duck Soup, Volpone, and Hamlet In the Marx Brothers’ Duck Sou (1 p933), there is a famous mirror scene in which the spies Pinky (Harpo) and Chicolini (Chico) try to steal the war plan from Rufus T. Firefly (Groucho). When Pinky attempts to escape from Firefly, he acci- dently shatters the mirror. Without anywhere to go, Pinky pretends that he is Fire- y fl ’s mirror image, imitating everything that the latter does. Not only can Pinky miraculously anticipate what Firefly does, but the relationship between the subject and the mirror object gets ambiguous as the scene goes on. When Firefly walks into the mirror, Pinky walks out from it. Intrigued by the image completely, Firefly acts as if he wants to sustain this illusion: when Pinky drops his straw on the floor, Firefly picks it up and hands it back to him. The scene ends when Chicolini barges in, creating the third image, breaking this illusion. Comparing this scene with an- other similar one in Volpo (1606), a co ne medy written by early modern dramatist Ben Jonson (1572–1637), this article attempts to explain the mechanism of comedy in these http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

The Comedy of the “Para-site”: Duck Soup, Volpone, and Hamlet

The Comparatist , Volume 40 – Nov 11, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/the-comedy-of-the-para-site-duck-soup-volpone-and-hamlet-EEbul8v6fo
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Isaac HuI The Comedy of the “Para- site” Duck Soup, Volpone, and Hamlet In the Marx Brothers’ Duck Sou (1 p933), there is a famous mirror scene in which the spies Pinky (Harpo) and Chicolini (Chico) try to steal the war plan from Rufus T. Firefly (Groucho). When Pinky attempts to escape from Firefly, he acci- dently shatters the mirror. Without anywhere to go, Pinky pretends that he is Fire- y fl ’s mirror image, imitating everything that the latter does. Not only can Pinky miraculously anticipate what Firefly does, but the relationship between the subject and the mirror object gets ambiguous as the scene goes on. When Firefly walks into the mirror, Pinky walks out from it. Intrigued by the image completely, Firefly acts as if he wants to sustain this illusion: when Pinky drops his straw on the floor, Firefly picks it up and hands it back to him. The scene ends when Chicolini barges in, creating the third image, breaking this illusion. Comparing this scene with an- other similar one in Volpo (1606), a co ne medy written by early modern dramatist Ben Jonson (1572–1637), this article attempts to explain the mechanism of comedy in these

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 11, 2016

There are no references for this article.