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The Civil War as Global Conflict: Transnational Meanings of the American Civil War ed. by David T. Gleeson and Simon Lewis (review)

The Civil War as Global Conflict: Transnational Meanings of the American Civil War ed. by David... Citizenship, Sexual Violence, and the Meaning of Race in the Postemancipation South (University of North Carolina Press, 2009). The Civil War as Global Conflict: Transnational Meanings of the American Civil War. Edited by David T. Gleeson and Simon Lewis. (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2014. Pp. 312. Cloth, $49.95.) Sven Beckert recently said of global history that, once attempted, it is the kind of approach that “is impossible to go back from.” And it so happens that the latter half of the nineteenth century has received a great deal of global historical attention, including from Beckert himself. Why? Because the era encapsulates much of what scholars have termed the “first age” of globalization, when markets were truly becoming globalized through modern advances in technology, transport, and communication. From Kevin O’Rourke and Jeffrey Williamson’s groundbreaking Globalization and History: The Evolution of a Nineteenth-Century Atlantic Economy (1999) to Thomas Bender’s A Nation among Nations: America’s Place in World History (2006) and Jürgen Osterhammel’s The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century (2014), inter- disciplinary scholarship has demonstrated that the American position in world affairs during the late nineteenth century was quite often peripheral, and quite often http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

The Civil War as Global Conflict: Transnational Meanings of the American Civil War ed. by David T. Gleeson and Simon Lewis (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 6 (1) – Mar 12, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Citizenship, Sexual Violence, and the Meaning of Race in the Postemancipation South (University of North Carolina Press, 2009). The Civil War as Global Conflict: Transnational Meanings of the American Civil War. Edited by David T. Gleeson and Simon Lewis. (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2014. Pp. 312. Cloth, $49.95.) Sven Beckert recently said of global history that, once attempted, it is the kind of approach that “is impossible to go back from.” And it so happens that the latter half of the nineteenth century has received a great deal of global historical attention, including from Beckert himself. Why? Because the era encapsulates much of what scholars have termed the “first age” of globalization, when markets were truly becoming globalized through modern advances in technology, transport, and communication. From Kevin O’Rourke and Jeffrey Williamson’s groundbreaking Globalization and History: The Evolution of a Nineteenth-Century Atlantic Economy (1999) to Thomas Bender’s A Nation among Nations: America’s Place in World History (2006) and Jürgen Osterhammel’s The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century (2014), inter- disciplinary scholarship has demonstrated that the American position in world affairs during the late nineteenth century was quite often peripheral, and quite often

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 12, 2016

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