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The Birth of Tragedy and The Awakening: Influences and Intertextualities

The Birth of Tragedy and The Awakening: Influences and Intertextualities The Birth of Tragedy and The Awakening: Influences and Intertextualities by Patricia L. Bradley For decades, scholars of Kate Chopin and her works have in- directly, or at least without much elucidation, acknowledged the Ni- etzschean strain they have observed in her canon, particularly in her masterpiece The Awakening (1899) . One recent example of this type of reference appears in the introduction to a new edition of Chopin’s fi rst novel At Fault (1890), in which the editors make the sweeping claim that “[n]umerous critics have remarked on Chopin’s familiarity with philo- sophical works, especially the German Romanticism of Friedrich Scho- penhauer and Friedrich Nietzsche” (Green and Caudle xxi). Addition- ally, two essays from the collection Kate Chopin Reconsidered: Beyond the Bayou (1992) make glancing and, at times, downright elliptical refer- ences to Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900) and certain of his works to il- lustrate images and metaphoric approaches Chopin shared with the rad- ical nineteenth-century German philosopher. Martha Fodaski Black begins her essay “The Quintessence of Cho- pinism” by tracing the bird imagery Chopin uses to set the opening scene in The Awakening to similar uses in George Bernard Shaw’s femi- nist essay “The Womanly Woman.” Black suggests http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

The Birth of Tragedy and The Awakening: Influences and Intertextualities

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 37 (2) – May 16, 2005

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

The Birth of Tragedy and The Awakening: Influences and Intertextualities by Patricia L. Bradley For decades, scholars of Kate Chopin and her works have in- directly, or at least without much elucidation, acknowledged the Ni- etzschean strain they have observed in her canon, particularly in her masterpiece The Awakening (1899) . One recent example of this type of reference appears in the introduction to a new edition of Chopin’s fi rst novel At Fault (1890), in which the editors make the sweeping claim that “[n]umerous critics have remarked on Chopin’s familiarity with philo- sophical works, especially the German Romanticism of Friedrich Scho- penhauer and Friedrich Nietzsche” (Green and Caudle xxi). Addition- ally, two essays from the collection Kate Chopin Reconsidered: Beyond the Bayou (1992) make glancing and, at times, downright elliptical refer- ences to Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900) and certain of his works to il- lustrate images and metaphoric approaches Chopin shared with the rad- ical nineteenth-century German philosopher. Martha Fodaski Black begins her essay “The Quintessence of Cho- pinism” by tracing the bird imagery Chopin uses to set the opening scene in The Awakening to similar uses in George Bernard Shaw’s femi- nist essay “The Womanly Woman.” Black suggests

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 16, 2005

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