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The Birth of Tragedy and The Awakening: Influences and Intertextualities

The Birth of Tragedy and The Awakening: Influences and Intertextualities The Birth of Tragedy and The Awakening: Influences and Intertextualities by Patricia L. Bradley For decades, scholars of Kate Chopin and her works have indirectly, or at least without much elucidation, acknowledged the Nietzschean strain they have observed in her canon, particularly in her masterpiece The Awakening (1899). One recent example of this type of reference appears in the introduction to a new edition of Chopin's first novel At Fault (1890), in which the editors make the sweeping claim that "[n]umerous critics have remarked on Chopin's familiarity with philosophical works, especially the German Romanticism of Friedrich Schopenhauer and Friedrich Nietzsche" (Green and Caudle xxi). Additionally, two essays from the collection Kate Chopin Reconsidered: Beyond the Bayou (1992) make glancing and, at times, downright elliptical references to Friedrich Nietzsche (1844­1900) and certain of his works to illustrate images and metaphoric approaches Chopin shared with the radical nineteenth-century German philosopher. Martha Fodaski Black begins her essay "The Quintessence of Chopinism" by tracing the bird imagery Chopin uses to set the opening scene in The Awakening to similar uses in George Bernard Shaw's feminist essay "The Womanly Woman." Black suggests other possible source texts, such as Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

The Birth of Tragedy and The Awakening: Influences and Intertextualities

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 37 (2) – May 16, 2005

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461
Publisher site
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Abstract

The Birth of Tragedy and The Awakening: Influences and Intertextualities by Patricia L. Bradley For decades, scholars of Kate Chopin and her works have indirectly, or at least without much elucidation, acknowledged the Nietzschean strain they have observed in her canon, particularly in her masterpiece The Awakening (1899). One recent example of this type of reference appears in the introduction to a new edition of Chopin's first novel At Fault (1890), in which the editors make the sweeping claim that "[n]umerous critics have remarked on Chopin's familiarity with philosophical works, especially the German Romanticism of Friedrich Schopenhauer and Friedrich Nietzsche" (Green and Caudle xxi). Additionally, two essays from the collection Kate Chopin Reconsidered: Beyond the Bayou (1992) make glancing and, at times, downright elliptical references to Friedrich Nietzsche (1844­1900) and certain of his works to illustrate images and metaphoric approaches Chopin shared with the radical nineteenth-century German philosopher. Martha Fodaski Black begins her essay "The Quintessence of Chopinism" by tracing the bird imagery Chopin uses to set the opening scene in The Awakening to similar uses in George Bernard Shaw's feminist essay "The Womanly Woman." Black suggests other possible source texts, such as Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 16, 2005

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