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The Belle Gone Bad--and Just Gone

The Belle Gone Bad--and Just Gone The Belle Gone Bad— and Just Gone by Carol S. Manning The Belle Gone Bad: White Southern Women Writers and the Dark Seductress. By Betina Entzminger. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 2002. 201 pp. $24.95. Among the feminist and revisionist studies of southern lit- erature that have emerged over the last twenty-fi ve years, several have probed methods southern women writers have used to challenge the limited roles their patriarchal society would allow to women. In this en- lightening new study, Betina Entzminger uncovers one more method. She takes as her text “the belle gone bad” or the dark seductress, an image she traces through fi ction by eleven women writers of the South, from the nineteenth century’s E.D.E.N. Southworth to our own Kaye Gibbons. Whereas most of the previous studies have examined chal- lenges to the patriarchy by single writers or by writers from a more nar- row time span, Entzminger’s study is notable for the scope of her under- taking and for the complexity of what she discovers. In her introduction, the author defi nes the belle gone bad as an exag- geration of the fl irtatious southern belle and “the opposite of the ideal southern lady”: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

The Belle Gone Bad--and Just Gone

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 37 (1) – Jan 11, 2005

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

The Belle Gone Bad— and Just Gone by Carol S. Manning The Belle Gone Bad: White Southern Women Writers and the Dark Seductress. By Betina Entzminger. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 2002. 201 pp. $24.95. Among the feminist and revisionist studies of southern lit- erature that have emerged over the last twenty-fi ve years, several have probed methods southern women writers have used to challenge the limited roles their patriarchal society would allow to women. In this en- lightening new study, Betina Entzminger uncovers one more method. She takes as her text “the belle gone bad” or the dark seductress, an image she traces through fi ction by eleven women writers of the South, from the nineteenth century’s E.D.E.N. Southworth to our own Kaye Gibbons. Whereas most of the previous studies have examined chal- lenges to the patriarchy by single writers or by writers from a more nar- row time span, Entzminger’s study is notable for the scope of her under- taking and for the complexity of what she discovers. In her introduction, the author defi nes the belle gone bad as an exag- geration of the fl irtatious southern belle and “the opposite of the ideal southern lady”:

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 11, 2005

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