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The Aesthetic Dimension of American-Romanian Comparative Literary Studies

The Aesthetic Dimension of American-Romanian Comparative Literary Studies Letitia Guran and the world eternally justified. (Nietzsche, BiVfh of Tragedy 33) [. . .] only as an aesthetic phenomenon are existence This essay is part of a larger project on the relevance of the aesthetic model for modern and contemporary Eastern Europe compared with its place in Western European and North American cultures. The first part briefly surveys recent positions on the topic that are symptomatic of the aesthetic debate in all these areas of the world. For the East European Constantin Noica, whose struggle to preserve high standards of education and culture in the 1980s made them symbolic figures of Romanian anticommunist "resistance through the aesthetic." To update this perspective, I later supplement Liiceanu's and Noica's outlook with that of younger critics who after the anticommunist revolution of 1989 placed the concept under serious scrutiny. Their move from an aesthetic-oriented criticism to a more politically committed one is part of the revision of the contemporary Romanian literary canon, and interestingly it parallels what has happened in American criticism over the last decade. To capture this uncanny resemblance I discuss Harold Bloom's, George Levine's, and J. Hillis Miller's positions, which focus on the implications of the decline http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

The Aesthetic Dimension of American-Romanian Comparative Literary Studies

The Comparatist , Volume 27 (1) – Oct 3, 2003

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887
Publisher site
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Abstract

Letitia Guran and the world eternally justified. (Nietzsche, BiVfh of Tragedy 33) [. . .] only as an aesthetic phenomenon are existence This essay is part of a larger project on the relevance of the aesthetic model for modern and contemporary Eastern Europe compared with its place in Western European and North American cultures. The first part briefly surveys recent positions on the topic that are symptomatic of the aesthetic debate in all these areas of the world. For the East European Constantin Noica, whose struggle to preserve high standards of education and culture in the 1980s made them symbolic figures of Romanian anticommunist "resistance through the aesthetic." To update this perspective, I later supplement Liiceanu's and Noica's outlook with that of younger critics who after the anticommunist revolution of 1989 placed the concept under serious scrutiny. Their move from an aesthetic-oriented criticism to a more politically committed one is part of the revision of the contemporary Romanian literary canon, and interestingly it parallels what has happened in American criticism over the last decade. To capture this uncanny resemblance I discuss Harold Bloom's, George Levine's, and J. Hillis Miller's positions, which focus on the implications of the decline

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 2003

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