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Tennessee Williams's A Streetcar Named Desire: A Global Perspective

Tennessee Williams's A Streetcar Named Desire: A Global Perspective r obert rea t ennessee w illiams ’s A s treetc A r nA med d esire A Global Perspective A Small Place begins with Jamaica Kincaid greeti ng a hypothetical guest on her nativ e island of Antigua. Immigrant “If you go to Antigua as a tourist , this is what you will see,” she insists, “since you are a tourist , the stories expand thought of what it might be like for someone who the range of had to live day in, day out in a place . . . must never cross your mind” (Kincaid 3–4). The rest of the book the drama records her angry response to the poverty and cor- far beyond a ruption that goes unnoticed by tourist s who floc k to the C aribbean for its powdery white beaches and city, region, crystal blue seascapes. Tennessee Williams set s or nation. The New Orleans in A Streetcar Named Desire at a simi - lar angle from the audience’ s point of view. A steady Kowalski family flow of migrants, commerce, and culture dissolves saga dissolves the borders that separate the South from the world. Before turning to the long-range view, let http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Tennessee Williams's A Streetcar Named Desire: A Global Perspective

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 49 (2) – May 12, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

r obert rea t ennessee w illiams ’s A s treetc A r nA med d esire A Global Perspective A Small Place begins with Jamaica Kincaid greeti ng a hypothetical guest on her nativ e island of Antigua. Immigrant “If you go to Antigua as a tourist , this is what you will see,” she insists, “since you are a tourist , the stories expand thought of what it might be like for someone who the range of had to live day in, day out in a place . . . must never cross your mind” (Kincaid 3–4). The rest of the book the drama records her angry response to the poverty and cor- far beyond a ruption that goes unnoticed by tourist s who floc k to the C aribbean for its powdery white beaches and city, region, crystal blue seascapes. Tennessee Williams set s or nation. The New Orleans in A Streetcar Named Desire at a simi - lar angle from the audience’ s point of view. A steady Kowalski family flow of migrants, commerce, and culture dissolves saga dissolves the borders that separate the South from the world. Before turning to the long-range view, let

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 12, 2018

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