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Sovereignty and Cruelty: Resistance or Refusal?

Sovereignty and Cruelty: Resistance or Refusal? Catherine Kellogg 1 Sovereignty and Cruelty Resistance or Refusal? In the summer of 2000, Jacques Derrida was invited by his friends Elisabeth Rou­ dinesco and Rene Major to speak to the annual gathering of the International Psychoanalytic Association in Paris. They auspiciously entitled the meeting “Es­ tates General of Psychoanalysis” in a deliberate reference to the Estates General, those events convened by Louis XI during times when he required the coopera­ tion of different parts of French society. The most notorious of the Estates General were those of 1789, when the third estate proclaimed itself a “national assembly,” inviting the other estates to join it in directing the future of France. Instead, the King closed the door of the conference to the national assembly, and so the third estate made an oath to rema in in camera until they had written a new constitution. The constitution they wrote not only eradicated the monarch and called for a con­ stituent assembly, it also famously enshrined the “rights of man and citizen.” This was the opening volley of the French Revolution, a revolution that led first to the King’s execution, then to The Terror and ultimately to the execution of Robespierre http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Sovereignty and Cruelty: Resistance or Refusal?

The Comparatist , Volume 45 – Nov 11, 2021

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Copyright © Society for Comparative Literature and the Arts
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Catherine Kellogg 1 Sovereignty and Cruelty Resistance or Refusal? In the summer of 2000, Jacques Derrida was invited by his friends Elisabeth Rou­ dinesco and Rene Major to speak to the annual gathering of the International Psychoanalytic Association in Paris. They auspiciously entitled the meeting “Es­ tates General of Psychoanalysis” in a deliberate reference to the Estates General, those events convened by Louis XI during times when he required the coopera­ tion of different parts of French society. The most notorious of the Estates General were those of 1789, when the third estate proclaimed itself a “national assembly,” inviting the other estates to join it in directing the future of France. Instead, the King closed the door of the conference to the national assembly, and so the third estate made an oath to rema in in camera until they had written a new constitution. The constitution they wrote not only eradicated the monarch and called for a con­ stituent assembly, it also famously enshrined the “rights of man and citizen.” This was the opening volley of the French Revolution, a revolution that led first to the King’s execution, then to The Terror and ultimately to the execution of Robespierre

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 11, 2021

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