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Southern Women Writers, Racism, and Racists

Southern Women Writers, Racism, and Racists Southern Women Writers, Racism, and Racists by Dawn Trouard Sites of Southern Memory: The Autobiographies of Katharine DuPre Lumpkin, Lillian Smith, and Pauli Murray. By Darlene O’Dell. Charlottesville: UP of Virginia, 2001. 192 pp. $45. Willa Cather’s Southern Connections: New Essays on Cather and the South. Edited by Ann Romines. Charlottesville: UP of Virginia, 2000. 249 pp. $18.95. Place has happily vexed southern literature and its critics since there was a South to bicker about. Where is it? What counts? Can its literature evade its geography? When is a southern author not a south- ern author? Or, suppose you have plenty of reason to hate the South but want to reinvent it, to exorcize it, or to lay it to rest? In very different ways these two volumes from the University Press of Virginia grapple with such conundrums. Sapphira and the Slave Girll is literally the text in the Willa Cather woodpile. Troublesome now to many Cather readers, this novel discom- bobulates the canonical Willa Cather and how we like to teach her. This fi nal Cather novel travels east away from the Nebraska territory claimed by the author and draws heavily from the author’s childhood. It recounts the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Southern Women Writers, Racism, and Racists

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 37 (1) – Jan 11, 2005

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Southern Women Writers, Racism, and Racists by Dawn Trouard Sites of Southern Memory: The Autobiographies of Katharine DuPre Lumpkin, Lillian Smith, and Pauli Murray. By Darlene O’Dell. Charlottesville: UP of Virginia, 2001. 192 pp. $45. Willa Cather’s Southern Connections: New Essays on Cather and the South. Edited by Ann Romines. Charlottesville: UP of Virginia, 2000. 249 pp. $18.95. Place has happily vexed southern literature and its critics since there was a South to bicker about. Where is it? What counts? Can its literature evade its geography? When is a southern author not a south- ern author? Or, suppose you have plenty of reason to hate the South but want to reinvent it, to exorcize it, or to lay it to rest? In very different ways these two volumes from the University Press of Virginia grapple with such conundrums. Sapphira and the Slave Girll is literally the text in the Willa Cather woodpile. Troublesome now to many Cather readers, this novel discom- bobulates the canonical Willa Cather and how we like to teach her. This fi nal Cather novel travels east away from the Nebraska territory claimed by the author and draws heavily from the author’s childhood. It recounts the

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 11, 2005

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