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Southeastern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (SEASECS) (review)

Southeastern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (SEASECS) (review) 342 } ear ly amer ican literatur e : Volu me 5 7, n u m B er 1 scholarly interest in “a small, scattered, seemingly powerless people,” but as the conference’s many excellent papers demonstrated, such an interest is more than warranted in the case of early American history. “What does it mean to write about a small group of people? A small population? How do you validate such an interest?” Keenan Spero asked. The answer was nearly unanimous among the conference’s participants: to write about t - he indi vidual, the forgotten, the particular, the exception to the rule, is not only to recover an essential dimension of the historical record, it is to funda - men tally challenge the epistemological usefulness of historical generalizations and teleological patterns and allow historical voices to speak in all their richness, complexity, idiosyncrasy, and contradiction. emily gowen Boston University Southeastern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (SEASECS) Virtual Conference, February 25–27, 2021 In April 2021, former US Senator Rick Santorum declared to a conservative youth convention that “[white Christians] birthed a nation from nothing. I mean, there was nothing here. I mean, yes we ha- ve Na tive Americans, but candidly, there http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early American Literature University of North Carolina Press

Southeastern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (SEASECS) (review)

Early American Literature , Volume 57 (1) – Feb 4, 2022

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-147X

Abstract

342 } ear ly amer ican literatur e : Volu me 5 7, n u m B er 1 scholarly interest in “a small, scattered, seemingly powerless people,” but as the conference’s many excellent papers demonstrated, such an interest is more than warranted in the case of early American history. “What does it mean to write about a small group of people? A small population? How do you validate such an interest?” Keenan Spero asked. The answer was nearly unanimous among the conference’s participants: to write about t - he indi vidual, the forgotten, the particular, the exception to the rule, is not only to recover an essential dimension of the historical record, it is to funda - men tally challenge the epistemological usefulness of historical generalizations and teleological patterns and allow historical voices to speak in all their richness, complexity, idiosyncrasy, and contradiction. emily gowen Boston University Southeastern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (SEASECS) Virtual Conference, February 25–27, 2021 In April 2021, former US Senator Rick Santorum declared to a conservative youth convention that “[white Christians] birthed a nation from nothing. I mean, there was nothing here. I mean, yes we ha- ve Na tive Americans, but candidly, there

Journal

Early American LiteratureUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 4, 2022

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