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Soundscapes Are Not Monolithic: Moving Toward Educational Liberation in K-12

Soundscapes Are Not Monolithic: Moving Toward Educational Liberation in K-12 <p>Abstract:</p><p>Like Black culture, soundscapes are not a monolith. In these personal essays, Black educators in North Carolina reflect on the intersections of their own identities and how they create and make meaning of soundscapes in their educational practice. The introduction provides a brief history of education in regards to <i>Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka</i>, as well as critiquing forms of white supremacy and racism that underpin educational settings. These Black educators view their classrooms as unique soundscapes that allow them to resist and respond to those unjust conditions. This article includes educators&apos; reflections on systems of oppression, considerations for how those systems influence their pedagogy, and specific classroom strategies for utilizing sound to create learning spaces for historically and traditionally marginalized students.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Soundscapes Are Not Monolithic: Moving Toward Educational Liberation in K-12

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South
ISSN
1534-1488

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>Like Black culture, soundscapes are not a monolith. In these personal essays, Black educators in North Carolina reflect on the intersections of their own identities and how they create and make meaning of soundscapes in their educational practice. The introduction provides a brief history of education in regards to <i>Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka</i>, as well as critiquing forms of white supremacy and racism that underpin educational settings. These Black educators view their classrooms as unique soundscapes that allow them to resist and respond to those unjust conditions. This article includes educators&apos; reflections on systems of oppression, considerations for how those systems influence their pedagogy, and specific classroom strategies for utilizing sound to create learning spaces for historically and traditionally marginalized students.</p>

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 17, 2022

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