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"Somehow Caught": Race and Deferred Sexuality in McCullers's The Member of the Wedding

"Somehow Caught": Race and Deferred Sexuality in McCullers's The Member of the Wedding " omehowCaught": S RaceandDeferredSexuality inMcCullers'sThe Member of the Wedding by Chad M. Jewett At the end of her first outing as her alter- ego "F. Jasmine," Frankie Addams, the young heroine of Carson McCullers's The Member of the Wedding (1946), stumbles upon an image that immediately arrests her, but that she cannot comprehend: She was walking home when all at once there was a shock in her as though a thrown knife had struck and shivered in her chest. F. Jasmine stopped dead in her tracks, one foot still raised, and at first she could not take in just what had happened . . . she had halfseen something, a dark double shape, in the alley she had just that moment passed. And because of this half-seen object, the quick flash in the corner of her eye, there had sprung up in her the sudden picture of her brother and the bride. . . . She did not look at it directly, for somehow it was as though she was almost afraid. . . . There in the alley were only two colored boys, one taller than the other and with his arm resting on the shorter boy's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

"Somehow Caught": Race and Deferred Sexuality in McCullers's The Member of the Wedding

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 45 (1) – Jul 19, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 The Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English and Comparative Literature.
ISSN
1534-1461
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

" omehowCaught": S RaceandDeferredSexuality inMcCullers'sThe Member of the Wedding by Chad M. Jewett At the end of her first outing as her alter- ego "F. Jasmine," Frankie Addams, the young heroine of Carson McCullers's The Member of the Wedding (1946), stumbles upon an image that immediately arrests her, but that she cannot comprehend: She was walking home when all at once there was a shock in her as though a thrown knife had struck and shivered in her chest. F. Jasmine stopped dead in her tracks, one foot still raised, and at first she could not take in just what had happened . . . she had halfseen something, a dark double shape, in the alley she had just that moment passed. And because of this half-seen object, the quick flash in the corner of her eye, there had sprung up in her the sudden picture of her brother and the bride. . . . She did not look at it directly, for somehow it was as though she was almost afraid. . . . There in the alley were only two colored boys, one taller than the other and with his arm resting on the shorter boy's

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 19, 2012

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