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"Somehow Caught": Race and Deferred Sexuality in McCullers's The Member of the Wedding

"Somehow Caught": Race and Deferred Sexuality in McCullers's The Member of the Wedding “SomehowCaught”: RaceandDeferredSexuality inMcCullers’sThe Member of the Wedding by Chad M. Jewett At the end of her first outing as her alter- ego “F. Jasmine,” Frankie Addams, the young heroine of Carson McCullers’s The Member of the Wedding (1946), stumbles upon an image that immediately arrests her, but that she cannot comprehend: She was walking home when all at once there was a shock in her as though a thrown knife had struck and shivered in her chest. F. Jas- mine stopped dead in her tracks, one foot still raised, and at first she could not take in just what had happened . . . she had half- seen something, a dark double shape, in the alley she had just that moment passed. And because of this half- seen object, the quick flash in the corner of her eye, there had sprung up in her the sud - den picture of her brother and the bride. . . . She did not look at it directly, for somehow it was as though she was almost afraid. . . . Th ere in the alley were only two colored boys, one taller than the other and with his arm resting on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

"Somehow Caught": Race and Deferred Sexuality in McCullers's The Member of the Wedding

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 45 (1) – Jul 19, 2013

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 The Southern Literary Journaland the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English and Comparative Literature.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

“SomehowCaught”: RaceandDeferredSexuality inMcCullers’sThe Member of the Wedding by Chad M. Jewett At the end of her first outing as her alter- ego “F. Jasmine,” Frankie Addams, the young heroine of Carson McCullers’s The Member of the Wedding (1946), stumbles upon an image that immediately arrests her, but that she cannot comprehend: She was walking home when all at once there was a shock in her as though a thrown knife had struck and shivered in her chest. F. Jas- mine stopped dead in her tracks, one foot still raised, and at first she could not take in just what had happened . . . she had half- seen something, a dark double shape, in the alley she had just that moment passed. And because of this half- seen object, the quick flash in the corner of her eye, there had sprung up in her the sud - den picture of her brother and the bride. . . . She did not look at it directly, for somehow it was as though she was almost afraid. . . . Th ere in the alley were only two colored boys, one taller than the other and with his arm resting on

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 19, 2013

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