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Slavery, Fatherhood, and Paternal Duty in African American Communities over the Long Nineteenth Century by Libra R. Hilde (review)

Slavery, Fatherhood, and Paternal Duty in African American Communities over the Long Nineteenth... cotton culture? Or do her findings suggest that that trickle, with Mexican encouragement, held potential to become a river, giving ironic gravitas to Walker’s prognosis that U.S. slavery would surely end by its gradual disap- pearance into Texas, Mexico, and Central and South America? That reservation aside, I would emphasize the breadth of Baumgartner’s writing, as she richly contextualizes her story, from 1580 through the U.S. Civil War and France’s intervention in Mexico to a U.S.-Mexico Claims Commission case in 1871 about a black petitioner enslaved during Maximilian’s regime by an ex-Confederate colonel in exile. Moreover, the book draws on exhaustive research in archival sources from an impres- sive number of repositories in the United States and Mexico and demon- strates mastery of historiography. Baumgartner’s elegant prose, engaging descriptive passages, and frequent vignettes are icing on the cake. All told, South to Freedom contributes substantively to scholarship on slavery, U.S.- Mexican relations, Texas history, legal history, and borderlands affairs, holds crossover appeal as a general public read, and should find its way into undergraduate and graduate curricula. Robert E. May notes 1. Freehling, The Road to Disunion: Secessionists at Bay, 1776–1854, vol. 1 (Oxford University Press, 1990), 418. robert http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Slavery, Fatherhood, and Paternal Duty in African American Communities over the Long Nineteenth Century by Libra R. Hilde (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 11 (4) – Nov 12, 2021

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

cotton culture? Or do her findings suggest that that trickle, with Mexican encouragement, held potential to become a river, giving ironic gravitas to Walker’s prognosis that U.S. slavery would surely end by its gradual disap- pearance into Texas, Mexico, and Central and South America? That reservation aside, I would emphasize the breadth of Baumgartner’s writing, as she richly contextualizes her story, from 1580 through the U.S. Civil War and France’s intervention in Mexico to a U.S.-Mexico Claims Commission case in 1871 about a black petitioner enslaved during Maximilian’s regime by an ex-Confederate colonel in exile. Moreover, the book draws on exhaustive research in archival sources from an impres- sive number of repositories in the United States and Mexico and demon- strates mastery of historiography. Baumgartner’s elegant prose, engaging descriptive passages, and frequent vignettes are icing on the cake. All told, South to Freedom contributes substantively to scholarship on slavery, U.S.- Mexican relations, Texas history, legal history, and borderlands affairs, holds crossover appeal as a general public read, and should find its way into undergraduate and graduate curricula. Robert E. May notes 1. Freehling, The Road to Disunion: Secessionists at Bay, 1776–1854, vol. 1 (Oxford University Press, 1990), 418. robert

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 12, 2021

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