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Skunked on the New York Cotton Exchange: What Really Happens to Jason Compson in The Sound and the Fury

Skunked on the New York Cotton Exchange: What Really Happens to Jason Compson in The Sound and... Skunked on the New York Cotton Exchange: What Really Happens to Jason Compson in The Sound and the Fury By Wayne W. Westbrook The New York Cotton Exchange takes a large chunk out of Jason Compson’s day on April 6, 1928 in William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury. Speculation in cotton futures is just one thing more that addles Jason and brings to ruin his nickel-and-dime schemes. For one who craves a prot fi on every deal, Compson gets a good drubbing in his cotton market trade. By the end of the day, he suffers a staggering loss from the short sale of one cotton futures contract, the total amount of which no one has yet put a specific dollar figure on. Nor is it clear that Faulkner himself did the math and realized how much Jason actually lost in this trade. The first commentator to understand that Jason sold a contract of cotton short on the New York Cotton Exchange was William W. Cobau in “Jason Compson and the Costs of Speculation.” Cobau does not establish just how much the speculation cost him, however: “How much money does Jason lose? We do not know” (258). The essential http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Skunked on the New York Cotton Exchange: What Really Happens to Jason Compson in The Sound and the Fury

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 41 (2) – May 21, 2009

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Skunked on the New York Cotton Exchange: What Really Happens to Jason Compson in The Sound and the Fury By Wayne W. Westbrook The New York Cotton Exchange takes a large chunk out of Jason Compson’s day on April 6, 1928 in William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury. Speculation in cotton futures is just one thing more that addles Jason and brings to ruin his nickel-and-dime schemes. For one who craves a prot fi on every deal, Compson gets a good drubbing in his cotton market trade. By the end of the day, he suffers a staggering loss from the short sale of one cotton futures contract, the total amount of which no one has yet put a specific dollar figure on. Nor is it clear that Faulkner himself did the math and realized how much Jason actually lost in this trade. The first commentator to understand that Jason sold a contract of cotton short on the New York Cotton Exchange was William W. Cobau in “Jason Compson and the Costs of Speculation.” Cobau does not establish just how much the speculation cost him, however: “How much money does Jason lose? We do not know” (258). The essential

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 21, 2009

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