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Simms in the War-Time Richmond Weeklies

Simms in the War-Time Richmond Weeklies Simms in the War-Time Richmond Weeklies by Miriam J. Shillingsburg When the Civil War began, South Carolinian William Gilmore Simms (1806–1870) lost not only his royalties valued between $1200 and $1800 per year, and his copyrights and plates worth, by his reck- oning, about $25,000 (Letters s IV: 397–399), but he also lost access to his regular publisher J. S. Redfi eld of New York. By January 1862, after having just buried the ninth of his fourteen children and with the war turning ominously from Virginia toward South Carolina, Simms began to complain of poor sleep and frightful dreams: I no longer read or write with satisfaction, or success [he wrote to William Porcher Miles]. . . . My occupation utterly gone, in this wretched state of war & confusion, I have no refuge in my wonted employments. . . . Could I go to work, as of old, having a motive, I might escape from much of the domestic thought. . . . But nobody reads nowadays, and no one prints. My desks are already fi lled with MS.S. Why add to the number—the mass,—when I so fre- quently feel like giving these to the fl ames? . http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Simms in the War-Time Richmond Weeklies

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Simms in the War-Time Richmond Weeklies by Miriam J. Shillingsburg When the Civil War began, South Carolinian William Gilmore Simms (1806–1870) lost not only his royalties valued between $1200 and $1800 per year, and his copyrights and plates worth, by his reck- oning, about $25,000 (Letters s IV: 397–399), but he also lost access to his regular publisher J. S. Redfi eld of New York. By January 1862, after having just buried the ninth of his fourteen children and with the war turning ominously from Virginia toward South Carolina, Simms began to complain of poor sleep and frightful dreams: I no longer read or write with satisfaction, or success [he wrote to William Porcher Miles]. . . . My occupation utterly gone, in this wretched state of war & confusion, I have no refuge in my wonted employments. . . . Could I go to work, as of old, having a motive, I might escape from much of the domestic thought. . . . But nobody reads nowadays, and no one prints. My desks are already fi lled with MS.S. Why add to the number—the mass,—when I so fre- quently feel like giving these to the fl ames? .

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 11, 2005

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