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Shrill Hurrrahs: Women, Gender, and Racial Violence in South Carolina, 1865–1900 by Kate Côté Gillin (review)

Shrill Hurrrahs: Women, Gender, and Racial Violence in South Carolina, 1865–1900 by Kate Côté... the complicated milieu in which the events occurred and closely interpret- ing the purpose and significance of each step in the process toward legal resolution, Ross helps the reader understand the important point that no matter how quotidian or spectacular, virtually all events were touched if not shaped by the politics of Reconstruction. In some places Ross may overstate his case. In both the introduction and again in the epilogue, Ross asserts that the people on whom this story focuses were “significant actors in the unfolding drama of Reconstruction” (7). This seems to me a debatable point. Yet, wherever one comes down on the question of an individual event or historical actor’s significance, the question itself provides an excellent way to shape a discussion about sig- nificance and how historians judge this important category. The question of significance aside, Ross certainly shows his reader how the lived experi - ences of his subjects were shaped by the ebb and flow of Reconstruction politics in New Orleans between 1862 and 1877. Impressively, Ross also traces the aftermath and ensuing decades for many of his subjects, provid- ing the details of their later lives—some of them quite tragic—and also leaving some http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Shrill Hurrrahs: Women, Gender, and Racial Violence in South Carolina, 1865–1900 by Kate Côté Gillin (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 6 (1) – Mar 12, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

the complicated milieu in which the events occurred and closely interpret- ing the purpose and significance of each step in the process toward legal resolution, Ross helps the reader understand the important point that no matter how quotidian or spectacular, virtually all events were touched if not shaped by the politics of Reconstruction. In some places Ross may overstate his case. In both the introduction and again in the epilogue, Ross asserts that the people on whom this story focuses were “significant actors in the unfolding drama of Reconstruction” (7). This seems to me a debatable point. Yet, wherever one comes down on the question of an individual event or historical actor’s significance, the question itself provides an excellent way to shape a discussion about sig- nificance and how historians judge this important category. The question of significance aside, Ross certainly shows his reader how the lived experi - ences of his subjects were shaped by the ebb and flow of Reconstruction politics in New Orleans between 1862 and 1877. Impressively, Ross also traces the aftermath and ensuing decades for many of his subjects, provid- ing the details of their later lives—some of them quite tragic—and also leaving some

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 12, 2016

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