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Sands of Imprisonment, Subjugation, and Empowerment: Reading Foucault in Kobo Abe's The Woman in the Dunes

Sands of Imprisonment, Subjugation, and Empowerment: Reading Foucault in Kobo Abe's The... Marianne Marrou M Sands of Imprisonment, Subjugation, and Empowerment Reading Foucault in Kobo Abe’s The Woman in the Dunes Any reader who is familiar with the c fi tion of the Japanese modernist writer and critic Kobo Abe understands that his works depict alienation, emptiness, and loss of identity and that many of his novels and plays deal primarily with characters who n fi d themselves entrapped in nightmarish situations they cannot escape, much as in Kafka, Beckett, and Ionesco. Hisaaki Yamanouchi states that Abe’s “works pro - vide a picture of life in which man is utterly lonely, deprived of communication with his fellow men and determined by physical reality. And yet what Abe intends to prescribe in his works is not despair but tough reasonableness with which to accept the inescapable reality of life; only by doing so can man justify his own exis- tence” (173). Nancy S. Hardin also brings to light the grim picture of Abe’s world, one that, in his novel e F Th ace of Another , charges modern man with the crimes of having lost one’s face, the crime of shutting off the roadway to others, the crime of having lost understanding http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Sands of Imprisonment, Subjugation, and Empowerment: Reading Foucault in Kobo Abe's The Woman in the Dunes

The Comparatist , Volume 31 – May 29, 2007

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Marianne Marrou M Sands of Imprisonment, Subjugation, and Empowerment Reading Foucault in Kobo Abe’s The Woman in the Dunes Any reader who is familiar with the c fi tion of the Japanese modernist writer and critic Kobo Abe understands that his works depict alienation, emptiness, and loss of identity and that many of his novels and plays deal primarily with characters who n fi d themselves entrapped in nightmarish situations they cannot escape, much as in Kafka, Beckett, and Ionesco. Hisaaki Yamanouchi states that Abe’s “works pro - vide a picture of life in which man is utterly lonely, deprived of communication with his fellow men and determined by physical reality. And yet what Abe intends to prescribe in his works is not despair but tough reasonableness with which to accept the inescapable reality of life; only by doing so can man justify his own exis- tence” (173). Nancy S. Hardin also brings to light the grim picture of Abe’s world, one that, in his novel e F Th ace of Another , charges modern man with the crimes of having lost one’s face, the crime of shutting off the roadway to others, the crime of having lost understanding

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 29, 2007

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