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Samuel Butler’s Life and Habit and the Modernist Literary Character: Rethinking the Subject through the Everyday

Samuel Butler’s Life and Habit and the Modernist Literary Character: Rethinking the Subject... Federico Bellini Samuel Butler's Life and Habit and the Modernist Literary Character Rethinking the Subject through the Everyday The last decade has seen a veritable resurgence of the theme of habit in philosophical and critical debates. While for decades the preference had been accorded to either the active forces of will and desire or the contingency and abruptness of the Event, thinkers have recently come back to habit from different paths and perspectives (Bennett et al.; Sparrow and Hutchinson; Carlisle). The polarization of attention around the theme of habit almost seems to mirror the veritable explosion of the discourse on habit which took place about two centuries ago. Even though the philosophical reflection on habit can be traced at least as far back as Aristotle it was at the end of the eighteenth century and in the early nineteenth century that the theme of habit, as asserted in the entry habitude of the Encyclopédie Philosophique Universelle, became "a new philosophical challenge" as an effect of "the refusal of innate ideas; the sensualist project deriving the modes of understanding from experience (generally exterior experience); the refusal, finally, of Hume's category of causality and its reduction to pure habit" (1108; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Samuel Butler’s Life and Habit and the Modernist Literary Character: Rethinking the Subject through the Everyday

The Comparatist , Volume 40 – Nov 11, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887
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Abstract

Federico Bellini Samuel Butler's Life and Habit and the Modernist Literary Character Rethinking the Subject through the Everyday The last decade has seen a veritable resurgence of the theme of habit in philosophical and critical debates. While for decades the preference had been accorded to either the active forces of will and desire or the contingency and abruptness of the Event, thinkers have recently come back to habit from different paths and perspectives (Bennett et al.; Sparrow and Hutchinson; Carlisle). The polarization of attention around the theme of habit almost seems to mirror the veritable explosion of the discourse on habit which took place about two centuries ago. Even though the philosophical reflection on habit can be traced at least as far back as Aristotle it was at the end of the eighteenth century and in the early nineteenth century that the theme of habit, as asserted in the entry habitude of the Encyclopédie Philosophique Universelle, became "a new philosophical challenge" as an effect of "the refusal of innate ideas; the sensualist project deriving the modes of understanding from experience (generally exterior experience); the refusal, finally, of Hume's category of causality and its reduction to pure habit" (1108;

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 11, 2016

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