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Samuel Beckett and the Terror of Literature by Christopher Langlois (review)

Samuel Beckett and the Terror of Literature by Christopher Langlois (review) The last three chapters focus on the works of Hungarian authors who are well known in the West: László Krasznahorkai, Péter Nádas, and Péter Esterházy. All three are concerned with the writers’ reflection of their own identity. Edith Zsa- dányi’s analysis of Krasznahorkai’s novels and their reception in the West “clearly shows that the author . . . is capable to transmitting aC n E ent ast- ral E uropean heritage to a globalizing world” (215). Lauren Walsh’s examines the instability of memory in Nadas’s works which “tackle, to use Nádas’s phrase, “big ideas”: t -he per ception of reality . . . and the individual experience of death” (238). Katalin Orban contrasts Esterházy’s Celestial Harmon a iend D s onald Bartheleme’s The Dead Father, pointing out that the two “were remarkably different in their approaches to the spaces, materials, and practices of social memory” (244), possibly because Esterházy’s memoir is not of a person but of a dynasty. The volume is an invaluable study of Hungarian literary criticism in terms of comparative studies. Works addressed focus on modern issues of comparative lit- erature, including questions of inclusion. S cal o- le d lesser known literatures are re- ceiving http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Samuel Beckett and the Terror of Literature by Christopher Langlois (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 43 – Nov 15, 2019

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Comparative Literature and the Arts
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

The last three chapters focus on the works of Hungarian authors who are well known in the West: László Krasznahorkai, Péter Nádas, and Péter Esterházy. All three are concerned with the writers’ reflection of their own identity. Edith Zsa- dányi’s analysis of Krasznahorkai’s novels and their reception in the West “clearly shows that the author . . . is capable to transmitting aC n E ent ast- ral E uropean heritage to a globalizing world” (215). Lauren Walsh’s examines the instability of memory in Nadas’s works which “tackle, to use Nádas’s phrase, “big ideas”: t -he per ception of reality . . . and the individual experience of death” (238). Katalin Orban contrasts Esterházy’s Celestial Harmon a iend D s onald Bartheleme’s The Dead Father, pointing out that the two “were remarkably different in their approaches to the spaces, materials, and practices of social memory” (244), possibly because Esterházy’s memoir is not of a person but of a dynasty. The volume is an invaluable study of Hungarian literary criticism in terms of comparative studies. Works addressed focus on modern issues of comparative lit- erature, including questions of inclusion. S cal o- le d lesser known literatures are re- ceiving

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 15, 2019

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