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Riding Deep Waters: An Appalachian Meditation

Riding Deep Waters: An Appalachian Meditation e liza B eth S . d . e n gelhardt r i D in G Deep Waters An Appalachian Meditation Solitude is deep water, and small boats do not ride well in it. Only a superficial observer could fail to understand that the mountain people Understanding really love their wilderness—love it for its beauty ,for its freedom. something as —Emma Bell Miles, The Spirit of the Mountains audacious as love requires In 1905, Emma Bell Miles wrote a parable in her dizzying Appalachian manifesto, The Spirit of the Mountains (17). Concerned with unfettered development , commitments new demeaning forms of service industry work, to uncertainty. and erosion of communit y that she witnessed in Chatt anooga and Walden’s Ridge, Tennessee, Miles picked up her pen to capt ure southern mount ain cultures before tourism, industry ,and rapid spread of national popular culture brought what she saw as devastating changes. Miles employed every strateg y she had to hand— close text ual description, poetry, paintings, folk- loric song recording and transcribi ng, linguistic gathering of phrases and dialect , interviews, and, fi nally, the political radical’s protest voice, all in the spare 201 pages of the book. Today we http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Riding Deep Waters: An Appalachian Meditation

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

e liza B eth S . d . e n gelhardt r i D in G Deep Waters An Appalachian Meditation Solitude is deep water, and small boats do not ride well in it. Only a superficial observer could fail to understand that the mountain people Understanding really love their wilderness—love it for its beauty ,for its freedom. something as —Emma Bell Miles, The Spirit of the Mountains audacious as love requires In 1905, Emma Bell Miles wrote a parable in her dizzying Appalachian manifesto, The Spirit of the Mountains (17). Concerned with unfettered development , commitments new demeaning forms of service industry work, to uncertainty. and erosion of communit y that she witnessed in Chatt anooga and Walden’s Ridge, Tennessee, Miles picked up her pen to capt ure southern mount ain cultures before tourism, industry ,and rapid spread of national popular culture brought what she saw as devastating changes. Miles employed every strateg y she had to hand— close text ual description, poetry, paintings, folk- loric song recording and transcribi ng, linguistic gathering of phrases and dialect , interviews, and, fi nally, the political radical’s protest voice, all in the spare 201 pages of the book. Today we

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 3, 2016

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