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Repudiating Faulkner: Race and Responsibility in Ellen Douglas's The Rock Cried Out

Repudiating Faulkner: Race and Responsibility in Ellen Douglas's The Rock Cried Out Repudiating Faulkner: Race and Responsibility in Ellen Douglas’s The Rock Cried Out by Suzan Harrison In a career spanning nearly four decades, Jackson, Mississippi writer Josephine Haxton has published seven novels and two collections under the pseudonym Ellen Douglas: A Family’s Affairs (1962), Black Cloud, White Cloud: Two Novellas and Two Stories (1963), Where the Dreams Cross (1968), Apostles of Light (1973), The Rock Cried Out (1979), A Lifetime Burning (1982), The Magic Carpet (1987), and Can’t Quit You, Baby (1988). These works have garnered numerous favorable reviews. In the New Y ork Times Book Review Jonathan Yardley called The Rock Cried Out “powerful and disturbing” and claimed, “it should secure Ellen Douglas’s place in the literature of the South” (24). The Washington Post calls A Lifetime Burning “a startling and entirely impressive departure from her earlier work” (Yardley 3). Can’t Quit You, Baby, writes Alfred Uhry in the New York Times Book Review, “is a haunting examination of the lives of two memo- rable women” (14). Despite her prolific output and the positive reception of her fiction, Douglas’s work has received surprisingly little critical at- tention until fairly recently, following the publication of her most recent collection, Truth: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Repudiating Faulkner: Race and Responsibility in Ellen Douglas's The Rock Cried Out

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 36 (1) – Dec 30, 2003

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Repudiating Faulkner: Race and Responsibility in Ellen Douglas’s The Rock Cried Out by Suzan Harrison In a career spanning nearly four decades, Jackson, Mississippi writer Josephine Haxton has published seven novels and two collections under the pseudonym Ellen Douglas: A Family’s Affairs (1962), Black Cloud, White Cloud: Two Novellas and Two Stories (1963), Where the Dreams Cross (1968), Apostles of Light (1973), The Rock Cried Out (1979), A Lifetime Burning (1982), The Magic Carpet (1987), and Can’t Quit You, Baby (1988). These works have garnered numerous favorable reviews. In the New Y ork Times Book Review Jonathan Yardley called The Rock Cried Out “powerful and disturbing” and claimed, “it should secure Ellen Douglas’s place in the literature of the South” (24). The Washington Post calls A Lifetime Burning “a startling and entirely impressive departure from her earlier work” (Yardley 3). Can’t Quit You, Baby, writes Alfred Uhry in the New York Times Book Review, “is a haunting examination of the lives of two memo- rable women” (14). Despite her prolific output and the positive reception of her fiction, Douglas’s work has received surprisingly little critical at- tention until fairly recently, following the publication of her most recent collection, Truth:

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Dec 30, 2003

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