Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Rebels against the Confederacy: North Carolina’s Unionists by Barton A. Myers (review)

Rebels against the Confederacy: North Carolina’s Unionists by Barton A. Myers (review) Rebels against the Confederacy: North Carolina’s Unionists. By Barton A. Myers. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Pp. 277. Cloth, $90.00.) In the 1870s black and white North Carolinians filed some 1,243 claims with the Southern Claims Commission seeking compensation for property taken from them by the Federal government and used to prosecute the Civil War. These southerners who, after the war, overwhelmingly found themselves economically devastated and threatened by their unrecon- structed neighbors, faced a formidable task. In addition to showing they had lost property and proving its value, they had to satisfy the commission of their “unconditional fidelity” to the Union throughout the war (7). Ultimately the commission approved only 362 claims. Each claim file consists of approximately thirty pages of testimony offered in response to a set of eighty standardized questions. These files are fraught with diffi - culty for historians. Claims were submitted years after the events for which the claimants sought recompense. Thus claimants were cast in the role of advocate: the temptation to embellish was inherent in the process. Despite these challenges, Barton Myers correctly identifies the claims as “the most reliable source on Unionism” (7). Not only do they shine a light http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Rebels against the Confederacy: North Carolina’s Unionists by Barton A. Myers (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 6 (1) – Mar 12, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/rebels-against-the-confederacy-north-carolina-s-unionists-by-barton-a-75ROzQ3goV
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Rebels against the Confederacy: North Carolina’s Unionists. By Barton A. Myers. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Pp. 277. Cloth, $90.00.) In the 1870s black and white North Carolinians filed some 1,243 claims with the Southern Claims Commission seeking compensation for property taken from them by the Federal government and used to prosecute the Civil War. These southerners who, after the war, overwhelmingly found themselves economically devastated and threatened by their unrecon- structed neighbors, faced a formidable task. In addition to showing they had lost property and proving its value, they had to satisfy the commission of their “unconditional fidelity” to the Union throughout the war (7). Ultimately the commission approved only 362 claims. Each claim file consists of approximately thirty pages of testimony offered in response to a set of eighty standardized questions. These files are fraught with diffi - culty for historians. Claims were submitted years after the events for which the claimants sought recompense. Thus claimants were cast in the role of advocate: the temptation to embellish was inherent in the process. Despite these challenges, Barton Myers correctly identifies the claims as “the most reliable source on Unionism” (7). Not only do they shine a light

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 12, 2016

There are no references for this article.