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Reanimating the Trope of the Talking Book in Alice Walkeris "Strong Horse Tea"

Reanimating the Trope of the Talking Book in Alice Walkeris "Strong Horse Tea" Reanimating the Trope of the Talking Book in Alice Walker’s “Strong Horse Tea” by Deborah Anne Hooker In a 1970 essay, “The Black Writer and the Southern Experi- ence,” Alice Walker qualifi es her refusal to “romanticize the Southern black country life” of her upbringing, recalling that while she “hated it, generally . . . no one could wish for a more advantageous heritage than that bequeathed to the black writer in the South: a compassion for the earth, a trust in humanity beyond our knowledge of evil, and an abiding love of justice” (21). Essays published in the 1980s, such as “Am I Blue” and “Everything is a Human Being,” and her more recent response to the events of September 11, 2001Sen , t by Earth, coalesce that southern, rural-bred “compassion for the earth” into a recognizable ecocritical world view. In “The Universe Responds,” for example, Walker unabash- edly stakes the richness of human creativity to the health of the natu- ral world: “we are connected to [animals] at least as intimately as we are connected to trees,” she says. “Without plant life human beings could not breathe. . . . Without free animal life . . . http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Reanimating the Trope of the Talking Book in Alice Walkeris "Strong Horse Tea"

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 37 (2) – May 16, 2005

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Reanimating the Trope of the Talking Book in Alice Walker’s “Strong Horse Tea” by Deborah Anne Hooker In a 1970 essay, “The Black Writer and the Southern Experi- ence,” Alice Walker qualifi es her refusal to “romanticize the Southern black country life” of her upbringing, recalling that while she “hated it, generally . . . no one could wish for a more advantageous heritage than that bequeathed to the black writer in the South: a compassion for the earth, a trust in humanity beyond our knowledge of evil, and an abiding love of justice” (21). Essays published in the 1980s, such as “Am I Blue” and “Everything is a Human Being,” and her more recent response to the events of September 11, 2001Sen , t by Earth, coalesce that southern, rural-bred “compassion for the earth” into a recognizable ecocritical world view. In “The Universe Responds,” for example, Walker unabash- edly stakes the richness of human creativity to the health of the natu- ral world: “we are connected to [animals] at least as intimately as we are connected to trees,” she says. “Without plant life human beings could not breathe. . . . Without free animal life . . .

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 16, 2005

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