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Reading The Awakening with Toni Morrison

Reading The Awakening with Toni Morrison with Toni Morrison by Joyce Dyer In recent years critics have begun to mention the influence of Toni Morrison on their reading of Kate Chopin's The Awakening. Elizabeth Ammons refers to Morrison's essay "Unspeakable Things Unspoken" as she moves from her initial thesis that Edna's freedom was purchased at the price of black women to the position that the novel, "so deliberately repressive of race on its surface" (76), is structured in a way that contradicts this seeming racism. Michele A. Birnbaum opens her essay "`Alien Hands': Kate Chopin and the Colonization of Race" with an epigraph from Morrison, as does Heather Kirk Thomas in "`The House of Sylvie' in Kate Chopin's `Athénaïse.' " Catherine Lundie uses Ammons' work with Morrison to inform her own study, "Doubly Dispossessed: Kate Chopin's Women of Color." And there have been others. But it is time that we give Morrison her full due. It is time that we say, in full voice--with pleasure and abundant thanks--how great has been her influence on our understanding of Chopin's treatment of race. More than any other single force -- post-modernism, post-colonialism, semiotics, or anything else--Toni Morrison has led us where we have needed so badly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Reading The Awakening with Toni Morrison

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 35 (1) – Jun 3, 2002

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461
Publisher site
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Abstract

with Toni Morrison by Joyce Dyer In recent years critics have begun to mention the influence of Toni Morrison on their reading of Kate Chopin's The Awakening. Elizabeth Ammons refers to Morrison's essay "Unspeakable Things Unspoken" as she moves from her initial thesis that Edna's freedom was purchased at the price of black women to the position that the novel, "so deliberately repressive of race on its surface" (76), is structured in a way that contradicts this seeming racism. Michele A. Birnbaum opens her essay "`Alien Hands': Kate Chopin and the Colonization of Race" with an epigraph from Morrison, as does Heather Kirk Thomas in "`The House of Sylvie' in Kate Chopin's `Athénaïse.' " Catherine Lundie uses Ammons' work with Morrison to inform her own study, "Doubly Dispossessed: Kate Chopin's Women of Color." And there have been others. But it is time that we give Morrison her full due. It is time that we say, in full voice--with pleasure and abundant thanks--how great has been her influence on our understanding of Chopin's treatment of race. More than any other single force -- post-modernism, post-colonialism, semiotics, or anything else--Toni Morrison has led us where we have needed so badly

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 3, 2002

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