Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Reading as Resistance: Practicing Literacy and Interconnection in Nadeem Aslam's The Golden Legend

Reading as Resistance: Practicing Literacy and Interconnection in Nadeem Aslam's The Golden... Beth Miller Reading as Resistance Practicing Literacy and Interconnection in Nadeem Aslam’s The Golden Legend “Literature means no one is forgotten.” Nadeem Aslam 1 Though oen r ft ead in the context of post- 9/11 literature, Nadeem Aslam’s novels also occupy their own unique territory in contemporary fic2t H iois t n. exts consistently carve out nuanced, compassionate spaces for both readers and characters where multiple perspectives find a voice, what Madeline Clements terms “conscience- heavy fiction” (53). The narratives’ multiplicity of voices takes root across the global landscape, guaranteeing a wide array of characters a place in which to speak but leaving it up to his readers whether or not these disparate perspectives will be heard. 3 Aslam’s 2017 novel e Th Golden Legend further enhances the significance of the interlocking narratives that characterize his lyrical, gripping oeuvre -. These nar ratives invite readers to form connections between them, just as the characters seek to locate their individual story’s place in relation to others’. Aslam’s novels tell the stories of ordinary people making sense of love, life, and loss in larger communal, cultural, national, and global circumstances, described by Peter Childs and James Green as “private individuals caught http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Reading as Resistance: Practicing Literacy and Interconnection in Nadeem Aslam's The Golden Legend

The Comparatist , Volume 43 – Nov 15, 2019

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/reading-as-resistance-practicing-literacy-and-interconnection-in-x2PvKtR77B
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Comparative Literature and the Arts
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Beth Miller Reading as Resistance Practicing Literacy and Interconnection in Nadeem Aslam’s The Golden Legend “Literature means no one is forgotten.” Nadeem Aslam 1 Though oen r ft ead in the context of post- 9/11 literature, Nadeem Aslam’s novels also occupy their own unique territory in contemporary fic2t H iois t n. exts consistently carve out nuanced, compassionate spaces for both readers and characters where multiple perspectives find a voice, what Madeline Clements terms “conscience- heavy fiction” (53). The narratives’ multiplicity of voices takes root across the global landscape, guaranteeing a wide array of characters a place in which to speak but leaving it up to his readers whether or not these disparate perspectives will be heard. 3 Aslam’s 2017 novel e Th Golden Legend further enhances the significance of the interlocking narratives that characterize his lyrical, gripping oeuvre -. These nar ratives invite readers to form connections between them, just as the characters seek to locate their individual story’s place in relation to others’. Aslam’s novels tell the stories of ordinary people making sense of love, life, and loss in larger communal, cultural, national, and global circumstances, described by Peter Childs and James Green as “private individuals caught

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 15, 2019

There are no references for this article.