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Provocation: "Add New Glory to Her Name" Phillis Wheatley Peters

Provocation: "Add New Glory to Her Name" Phillis Wheatley Peters <p>Abstract:</p><p>Although we routinely refer to white women who wed after their rise to literary fame by their married names, Phillis Wheatley Peters has long been identified by the name of her enslavers—despite an abundance of evidence that she thought of herself as Phillis Peters and preferred to be known by that name. In her poetry, Peters repeatedly reflects on the importance and symbolic significance of naming practices, and those who study her work should honor her desire to be known as Phillis Peters rather than Phillis Wheatley.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early American Literature University of North Carolina Press

Provocation: "Add New Glory to Her Name" Phillis Wheatley Peters

Early American Literature , Volume 56 (3) – Oct 30, 2021

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-147X

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>Although we routinely refer to white women who wed after their rise to literary fame by their married names, Phillis Wheatley Peters has long been identified by the name of her enslavers—despite an abundance of evidence that she thought of herself as Phillis Peters and preferred to be known by that name. In her poetry, Peters repeatedly reflects on the importance and symbolic significance of naming practices, and those who study her work should honor her desire to be known as Phillis Peters rather than Phillis Wheatley.</p>

Journal

Early American LiteratureUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 30, 2021

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