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Politics and the White Southern Woman Writer

Politics and the White Southern Woman Writer Politics and the White Southern Woman Writer by Jon Smith Eudora Welty and Politics: Did the Writer Crusade? Edited by Harriet Pollack and Suzanne Marrs. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 2001. 208 pp. $42.95 Revising Flannery O’Connor: Southern Literary Culture and the Problem of Female Authorship. By Katherine Hemple Prown. Charlottesville: UP of Virginia, 2001. 208 pp. $35.00 Even we shall lie enfolded in perspective one day: what we hoped along with what we did, what we didn’t do, and not only what we were but what we missed being, what others yet to come might dare to be. For we are our own crusade. Before ever we write, we are. — Eudora Welty, “Must the Novelist Crusade?” A telling confusion between novels and novelists lurks at the heart of Eudora Welty’s famous essay “Must the Novelist Crusade?” Of course good novels s do not crusade, but that’s not the point: good novel- ists s frequently do. Welty must have known—to cite but two examples— of Zola’s campaign for Dreyfus and, more immediately, Katherine Anne Porter’s crusading for Sacco and Vanzetti. Yet when Welty allegedly re- ceives a midnight call “over long distance” from a “stranger” who asks “All http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Politics and the White Southern Woman Writer

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 37 (1) – Jan 11, 2005

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Politics and the White Southern Woman Writer by Jon Smith Eudora Welty and Politics: Did the Writer Crusade? Edited by Harriet Pollack and Suzanne Marrs. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 2001. 208 pp. $42.95 Revising Flannery O’Connor: Southern Literary Culture and the Problem of Female Authorship. By Katherine Hemple Prown. Charlottesville: UP of Virginia, 2001. 208 pp. $35.00 Even we shall lie enfolded in perspective one day: what we hoped along with what we did, what we didn’t do, and not only what we were but what we missed being, what others yet to come might dare to be. For we are our own crusade. Before ever we write, we are. — Eudora Welty, “Must the Novelist Crusade?” A telling confusion between novels and novelists lurks at the heart of Eudora Welty’s famous essay “Must the Novelist Crusade?” Of course good novels s do not crusade, but that’s not the point: good novel- ists s frequently do. Welty must have known—to cite but two examples— of Zola’s campaign for Dreyfus and, more immediately, Katherine Anne Porter’s crusading for Sacco and Vanzetti. Yet when Welty allegedly re- ceives a midnight call “over long distance” from a “stranger” who asks “All

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 11, 2005

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