Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Paternal Nightmare: Division and Masculinity in the Restored Edition of A Death in the Family

Paternal Nightmare: Division and Masculinity in the Restored Edition of A Death in the Family Paternal Nightmare: Division and Masculinity in The Restored Edition of A Death in the Family by James A. Crank On the surface, A Death in the Family appears to be James Agee’s dreamy meditation on his childhood and its defining event: the sudden death of his father in an automobile crash when Agee was only six years old. Early in its imagining, Agee believed the book would not be a work written for any aesthetic value but rather for its intrinsic personal value, especially because through it he had hoped not only to complete a picture of his absent and heroic father but finally to piece together the interior image of himself and project it for his reader. Originally published posthumously by Agee’s editor and long- time friend David McDowell in 1957,A Death in the Family won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1958. In 2007, fifty years after its initial publication, the University of Tennes - see Press offered readers “a restoration” of Agee’s original text, edited by Michael A. Lofaro. The progression of this newly restored edition of A Death in the Family moves from Agee’s first recollections of life with his father to his father’s death http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Paternal Nightmare: Division and Masculinity in the Restored Edition of A Death in the Family

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 42 (2) – Jul 4, 2010

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/paternal-nightmare-division-and-masculinity-in-the-restored-edition-of-5c9lTJ0M5d
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Paternal Nightmare: Division and Masculinity in The Restored Edition of A Death in the Family by James A. Crank On the surface, A Death in the Family appears to be James Agee’s dreamy meditation on his childhood and its defining event: the sudden death of his father in an automobile crash when Agee was only six years old. Early in its imagining, Agee believed the book would not be a work written for any aesthetic value but rather for its intrinsic personal value, especially because through it he had hoped not only to complete a picture of his absent and heroic father but finally to piece together the interior image of himself and project it for his reader. Originally published posthumously by Agee’s editor and long- time friend David McDowell in 1957,A Death in the Family won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1958. In 2007, fifty years after its initial publication, the University of Tennes - see Press offered readers “a restoration” of Agee’s original text, edited by Michael A. Lofaro. The progression of this newly restored edition of A Death in the Family moves from Agee’s first recollections of life with his father to his father’s death

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 4, 2010

There are no references for this article.