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Our South or Theirs?

Our South or Theirs? Our South or Theirs? By Michael O'Brien The South that Wasn't There: Postsouthern Memory and History. By Michael Kreyling. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 2010. xi + 223 pp. $48.00 cloth. Our South: Geographic Fantasy and the Rise of National Literature. By Jennifer Rae Greeson. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 2010. x + 356 pp. $39.95 cloth. You may recall the old song by Kurt Weill and Maxwell Anderson, which begins, "It's a long, long time from May to December, but the days grow short, when you reach September." I did, when reading these two books together, since (in terms of their intellectual careers) Michael Kreyling might be said to have reached September, and Jennifer Greeson is still in May. The former writes as one of the South's preeminent literary critics, a little battle-scarred, a touch elegiac, and not too bothered about loose ends. The latter seems self-confident, intellectually ambitious, and very concerned to be systematic. There is not much of a conversation between May and September, since neither mentions the other, though Kreyling is more conscious of the existence of younger voices who have challenged and changed his subject matter than Greeson seems to be of older voices, who http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English .
ISSN
1534-1461
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Abstract

Our South or Theirs? By Michael O'Brien The South that Wasn't There: Postsouthern Memory and History. By Michael Kreyling. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 2010. xi + 223 pp. $48.00 cloth. Our South: Geographic Fantasy and the Rise of National Literature. By Jennifer Rae Greeson. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 2010. x + 356 pp. $39.95 cloth. You may recall the old song by Kurt Weill and Maxwell Anderson, which begins, "It's a long, long time from May to December, but the days grow short, when you reach September." I did, when reading these two books together, since (in terms of their intellectual careers) Michael Kreyling might be said to have reached September, and Jennifer Greeson is still in May. The former writes as one of the South's preeminent literary critics, a little battle-scarred, a touch elegiac, and not too bothered about loose ends. The latter seems self-confident, intellectually ambitious, and very concerned to be systematic. There is not much of a conversation between May and September, since neither mentions the other, though Kreyling is more conscious of the existence of younger voices who have challenged and changed his subject matter than Greeson seems to be of older voices, who

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 17, 2011

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