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Ontological Terror: Blackness, Nihilism, and Emancipation by Calvin L. Warren (review)

Ontological Terror: Blackness, Nihilism, and Emancipation by Calvin L. Warren (review) of postmodernism but the emergence of something else—the shapes and sizes of contemporary cultural practices.  Babeș- Bolyai University alex ciorogar Calvin L. Warren, Ontological Terror: Blackness, Nihilism, and Emancipation. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2018, 220pp. Calvin L. Warren introduces the reader to Ontological T , as a co error nceptual framework, by staging an antagonism. In this scene, Warren details his decision to occupy the position of the lone antagonist at a Black Lives Matter event put together to discuss the murder of Michael Brown and the police state. Taking on what he terms his “nihilistic responsibility,” Warren proceeds to tell the audience there is “no solution to the problem and antiblackness” and that “humanist af- fect . . . will not translate into freedom, justice, recognition, or resolution” (3). His comments came in direct response to the prophetic posturing ofp a co- anelist, a n American Law professor, who insisted, upon other things, that the law has a duty to “end discrimination” and “restore justice” for Black people. This insistence on demanding rights and legal inclusion as the rightful promise of emancipation, was met with thunderous applause. Warren, however, contends there is no evidence to support http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Ontological Terror: Blackness, Nihilism, and Emancipation by Calvin L. Warren (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 43 – Nov 15, 2019

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Comparative Literature and the Arts
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

of postmodernism but the emergence of something else—the shapes and sizes of contemporary cultural practices.  Babeș- Bolyai University alex ciorogar Calvin L. Warren, Ontological Terror: Blackness, Nihilism, and Emancipation. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2018, 220pp. Calvin L. Warren introduces the reader to Ontological T , as a co error nceptual framework, by staging an antagonism. In this scene, Warren details his decision to occupy the position of the lone antagonist at a Black Lives Matter event put together to discuss the murder of Michael Brown and the police state. Taking on what he terms his “nihilistic responsibility,” Warren proceeds to tell the audience there is “no solution to the problem and antiblackness” and that “humanist af- fect . . . will not translate into freedom, justice, recognition, or resolution” (3). His comments came in direct response to the prophetic posturing ofp a co- anelist, a n American Law professor, who insisted, upon other things, that the law has a duty to “end discrimination” and “restore justice” for Black people. This insistence on demanding rights and legal inclusion as the rightful promise of emancipation, was met with thunderous applause. Warren, however, contends there is no evidence to support

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 15, 2019

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