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Notes Toward (Inhabiting) the Black Messianic in Afro-Pessimism's Apocalyptic Thought

Notes Toward (Inhabiting) the Black Messianic in Afro-Pessimism's Apocalyptic Thought Andrew SAntAnA KAplAn Notes Toward (Inhabiting) the Black Messianic in Afro- Pessimism’s Apocalyptic o Th ught e Th re will be no peace in America until whites begin to hate their whiteness, asking from the depths of their being: “How can we become black?” James H. Cone,1 A Black Theology of Liberation [To] allow[] the notion of freedom to attain the ethical purity of its ontological status [i.e., as gratuitous rather than con ], o tin n g een wt ould have to lose one’s Human coordinates and become Black. Which is to say one would have to die. Frank B. Wilderson III, Red, White & Black What shall we say then? Should we persist in sin so that grace might abound? Let it not be! We who have died to sin, how shall we live in it? Or are you unaware that we—as many as were baptized into the Mes2 s iah, Jesus—were baptized into his death? . . . For the one who has died is absolved from sin. And, if we died with the Messiah, . . . [we] are not under Law, but rather under grace. . . . And having been liberated from sin http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Notes Toward (Inhabiting) the Black Messianic in Afro-Pessimism's Apocalyptic Thought

The Comparatist , Volume 43 – Nov 15, 2019

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Comparative Literature and the Arts
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Andrew SAntAnA KAplAn Notes Toward (Inhabiting) the Black Messianic in Afro- Pessimism’s Apocalyptic o Th ught e Th re will be no peace in America until whites begin to hate their whiteness, asking from the depths of their being: “How can we become black?” James H. Cone,1 A Black Theology of Liberation [To] allow[] the notion of freedom to attain the ethical purity of its ontological status [i.e., as gratuitous rather than con ], o tin n g een wt ould have to lose one’s Human coordinates and become Black. Which is to say one would have to die. Frank B. Wilderson III, Red, White & Black What shall we say then? Should we persist in sin so that grace might abound? Let it not be! We who have died to sin, how shall we live in it? Or are you unaware that we—as many as were baptized into the Mes2 s iah, Jesus—were baptized into his death? . . . For the one who has died is absolved from sin. And, if we died with the Messiah, . . . [we] are not under Law, but rather under grace. . . . And having been liberated from sin

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 15, 2019

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