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Not Real Good at Modern Life: Appalachian Pentecostals in the Works of Lee Smith

Not Real Good at Modern Life: Appalachian Pentecostals in the Works of Lee Smith andreW C onn olly no t re al good at modern life Appalachian Pentecostals in the Works of Lee Smith In his 1996 essay “Writing on the Cusp: Double Alterity and Minority Discourse in Appalachia,” Richard Cunningham urges Appalachian writers Smith to start writing about, and therefore defi ning, them- ultimately selves: “we Appalachian writers are en(cou)raged to promotes a fi ll in the blanks ourselves . . . to displace the catego- ries of domination in both directions and thereby to neoliberal push open not a vacuum but a creative space” (46). conception of The directions Cunningham refers to are the North and the South; while the North uses the stereotypes both religion of Appalachia to characterize all of the Southern and class by United States, the South displaces those caricatures solely on the Appalachian people themselves, mak- depicting both ing them akin to “an Other’s Other” (42). Elsewhere, the lower Cunningham, like many Appalachian scholars, has noted that Appalachian people are frequently por- class status trayed “as never really moving beyond some ‘clas- and restrictive sic’ period” (“Appalachianism” 127). Appalachian people are “Others” who are “not regarded as adults religious but as children . . . not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Not Real Good at Modern Life: Appalachian Pentecostals in the Works of Lee Smith

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 49 (1) – Jun 15, 2017

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

andreW C onn olly no t re al good at modern life Appalachian Pentecostals in the Works of Lee Smith In his 1996 essay “Writing on the Cusp: Double Alterity and Minority Discourse in Appalachia,” Richard Cunningham urges Appalachian writers Smith to start writing about, and therefore defi ning, them- ultimately selves: “we Appalachian writers are en(cou)raged to promotes a fi ll in the blanks ourselves . . . to displace the catego- ries of domination in both directions and thereby to neoliberal push open not a vacuum but a creative space” (46). conception of The directions Cunningham refers to are the North and the South; while the North uses the stereotypes both religion of Appalachia to characterize all of the Southern and class by United States, the South displaces those caricatures solely on the Appalachian people themselves, mak- depicting both ing them akin to “an Other’s Other” (42). Elsewhere, the lower Cunningham, like many Appalachian scholars, has noted that Appalachian people are frequently por- class status trayed “as never really moving beyond some ‘clas- and restrictive sic’ period” (“Appalachianism” 127). Appalachian people are “Others” who are “not regarded as adults religious but as children . . . not

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 15, 2017

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